Ernest Luning

RMGO heckles Owens on guns, DeGette dodges primary opponent

The Colorado Statesman

Fifteen Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … Republicans should have had a routine state assembly and convention — there were no major statewide races splitting delegates, George W. Bush had sewn up the presidential nomination, and the GOP was safely in control of the congressional delegation and Legislature — but tensions were high, and Gov. Bill Owens was the target of much contention over guns, an issue that split delegates fiercely.

Denver elects four to council in run-offs

The Colorado Statesman

Denver voters elected four newcomers to City Council in a run-off election on Tuesday, bringing to seven the number of rookies who will take office on the 13-member body next month. It’s the most turnover since 2003, when term limits kicked in and shook up the city council.

Remembering the Fallen

The Colorado Statesman

Wearing a red shirt declaring that she is among the “Proud Colorado Marine Moms,” Julie Taylor sat near the back of the POF Hall on Saturday in Denver among hundreds of friends, family members and fellow veterans and service members who gathered to remember the fallen for Memorial Day.

Hick, Gardner talk energy future

The Colorado Statesman

Gov. John Hickenlooper told a crowd of energy industry and civic leaders on Wednesday that he doesn’t expect restrictions on hydraulic fracturing and drilling to reach the ballot next year. The former geologist contended that enthusiasm for anti-fracking measures has ebbed since a year ago, when ballot measures were at the center of hotly contested political fights.

“There will be proposals,” he said, “but I don’t think there’ll be something funded to a significant extent. I don’t expect there to be something that’ll get on the ballot.”

YESTERYEAR

Federal term limits get kibosh, Duke recall fizzles over fears

The Colorado Statesman

Twenty Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down an Arkansas law that put term limits on members of Congress, bringing to a screeching halt — at least for the time being — the principle at the federal level, five years after Colorado had launched the grassroots movement. Since former state Sen. Terry Considine, R-Englewood, started things rolling with a ballot initiative, 24 states had enacted similar laws.

Chandelier kicks off next phase of rehab

The Colorado Statesman

On Monday, contractors lowered the massive brass chandelier that hangs above the Colorado House of Representatives onto a platform and began taking it apart. It’s the start of the second phase of a three-year project designed to restore the legislative chambers to their historic appearance.

“We like to say we’re lowering it, not that we’re dropping it,” quipped Gary Behm, owner of St. Louis Antique Lighting Co., as assistants began dismantling the chandelier, which dates to the 1890s.

YESTERYEAR

Ritter jumps in, Lamm lashes back, Rogers wants veto

The Colorado Statesman

Ten Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman ... Former three-term Denver District Attorney Bill Ritter officially filed his paperwork for a run for governor, though he made clear that a formal announcement would come later. “With four children, 10 brothers and sisters and 32 nieces and nephews, I have a huge stake in the future,” said Ritter. Former Senate Minority Leader Mike Feeley was Ritter’s treasurer. Other early endorsers included Frank and Martelle Daniels, Bruce Alexander, Dr.

Mizel Institute honors Hirschfeld at annual dinner

The Colorado Statesman

It’s tough to get a room full of even a few politicians, civic leaders and public servants to agree about anything, but on Wednesday night some 2,000 of them packed a cavernous converted Air Force hanger and were united in at least one sentiment: the community has benefited immensely from the generosity of A. Barry Hirschfeld.

‘It’s Broke, Fix It’

Business, agriculture groups call for immigration solutions from GOP

The Colorado Statesman

Last year, Front Range grocery store customers ate plenty of sweet corn grown at Sakata Farms. But the Brighton producer’s other major summer vegetable, cabbage, didn’t make it to kitchen tables, left unharvested in the field. And forget about broccoli, another labor-intensive crop. The farm has supplied most of the metro-area’s locally grown broccoli in recent years, but its owners didn’t bother planting last spring, because they couldn’t count on having enough workers to get it to market.

Primaries, Lamm to White House and police snafu

The Colorado Statesman

35 Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … The race for the chance to challenge U.S. Sen. Gary Hart was heating up. Attorney John Cogswell was the overwhelming choice of state Republican Party county chairs to take on the first-term Democrat, preferred by 36 percent of the chairs surveyed by The Statesman. Former Georgia Rep. Howard “Bo” Callaway came in second, with 19 percent support, followed by Colorado Secretary of State Mary Estill Buchannan, who was the favorite of 10 percent of the county chairs. State Sen.