Miller Hudson

Columnist

Hudson: Honest, humble Jimmy Carter set the bar

The Colorado Statesman

I was 31 years old and living in Denver when I cast my first ballot for president in 1976. My 10-year absence from the polls wasn’t for a lack of interest but was a product of circumstance. The voting age hadn’t yet changed to 18 in 1964, so I missed the Johnson-Goldwater contest. Then in 1968 I was serving in the Navy at a time when no real effort was made to provide service members absentee ballots. In October 1972 I was moving to Colorado from Maryland, long before early voting was offered there and far too late to register here.

Columnist

Hudson: RBI honchos handicap presidential candidates

The Colorado Statesman

Rick Ridder and Joanie Braden, the venerable founders of Denver’s RBI political consulting firm, addressed the Downtown Democratic Forum breakfast last Friday. Asked to handicap the pending presidential campaign, Democrat Ridder brought his experience as Howard Dean’s 2004 campaign manager, and more than 40 years consulting with candidates and campaigns across the world, including a stint as president of the International Association of Political Consultants.

Dems pick Larimer County for ’16 state convention

The Colorado Statesman

The Colorado Democratic Party’s Executive Committee approved the selection of the Budweiser Events Center in Larimer County for next year’s state convention at the committee’s meeting in Salida on Saturday.

Hudson: Tracking The Donald in GOP debate

The Colorado Statesman

The 24 million Americans who watched last week’s initial Republican presidential primary debate were not all Republicans. A hundred Democrats, give or take, gathered at the Governor’s Park sports bar in Denver to view what they hoped would prove an embarrassing clown car competition. If it weren’t for the closed captioning on multiple flat screen TVs it would have been impossible to understand a word of what the candidates were saying.

Columnist

Hudson: Move to reverse Citizens United can be an uphill, lonely battle

The Colorado Statesman

Stephen Justino of Move to Amend drew a dozen voters to the Mercury Café in Denver on Sunday for a Call to Action aimed at overturning the Supreme Court’s Citizens United v. FEC ruling. The 2010 decision established two legal principals: Corporations are entitled to free speech protections like those extended to persons, and spending on political matters equals speech, so spending constraints constitute an improper limitation on free speech.

Columnist

Hudson: Chamber of Americas hears discussion about Trans-Pacific trade agreement

The Colorado Statesman

Last Thursday the Chamber of the Americas sponsored a luncheon tutorial to explain the pending Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement at the Palm restaurant in Denver. Chamber director Gil Cisneros invited Tyler Rauert, a trade attorney with the Polaris Law Group in Longmont, to educate members on the TPP’s potential impacts on Colorado exporters. Rauert kicked off his remarks by pointing out that “there is absolutely nothing sexy about trade agreements.

State of Health

Colorado’s health co-op seeks just-right ‘Goldilocks’ zone

The Colorado Statesman

Amidst the marketplace turmoil generated by the Affordable Care Act, an entirely new entity was created in 23 states: a non-profit, member-owned health care co-op. Two of these have already closed their doors — one, covering Iowa and Nebraska, after undergoing bankruptcy and another, in Louisiana, in an orderly shutdown that will be completed by the end of the year. Several others are experiencing financial difficulties and their survival is in doubt. In Colorado, this non-profit insuror is the Colorado Health-OP, which covers 80,000 lives.

Columnist

Denver city council turnover marks end of an era

The Colorado Statesman

It was certainly a shock to me when Michael Hancock, who graduated from Manual High School with my son, was elected Mayor four years ago. Pundits like to dwell on the theory of generational change following each election. Jeanne Faatz and Charlie Brown, who left the Denver City Council this past week, were first elected to the Legislature a few years either side of 1980. They were part of the first wave of Colorado politicians who were children of the ‘60s; veterans of Viet Nam and candidates who could claim John Kennedy’s call to public service had resonated in their lives.

Biennial panelists wrestle with questions of drug legalization

The Colorado Statesman

The Biennial of the Americas Festival in Denver closed with a symposium designed to goose the interest of delegates last Thursday evening called “Legalization: The Next phase in the War on Drugs?” Gov. John Hickenlooper was joined by former Chilean President Ricardo Lagos; Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse; and moderator Tina Brown, former editor at Vanity Fair and The New Yorker.

Hemisphere's future talk of Biennial of the Americas Festival

The Colorado Statesman

It was fitting that Denver’s third Biennial of the Americas festival launched the same day as the Legislative Audit Committee’s report of shrinking crowds attending the Colorado State Fair in Pueblo. A staff of several dozen has spent the past six months finalizing the schedule of events that make up this cross-cultural festival of arts, culture and business in the New World. Nearly 300 musicians, artists, authors, entrepreneurs and academics from 25 countries have assembled in downtown Denver to tug on the threads that bind the Western Hemisphere together.