Miller Hudson

HUDSON: WELCOME HOME!

Colorado Army National Guard Space Support Teams did their jobs well

Contributing Columnist

Last summer I wrote about the departure of Colorado Army National Guard Space Support Teams 15 & 28 for their active duty deployment to Afghanistan. Last week they returned home following nine months of barracks life in Kandahar and at Camp Leatherneck, respectively. Their welcoming ceremony was held in the Air and Space Museum at Petersen Air Force Base in Colorado Springs. The crowd was about half the size of the one that saw them off on the first of July, and was largely composed of family members.

HUDSON: DRIVING FAST AND SLOW ON I-70

What if this state assembly were held in Summit County in February?

GUEST COLUMNIST

As my stepson and I were traveling from Denver to Copper Mountain last week for our final ski day of the season, we completed the trip in just under 90 minutes. Lousy snow and good weather conspired to make our journey swift and relatively painless, much like most trips were when I-70 was constructed more than 40 years ago. Since a second tunnel bore enabled four traffic lanes beneath the Continental Divide there have been few changes to the highway.

HUDSON: VOTERS, DON’T BE DUPED

So-called personnel reform is a thoroughly modern solution in search of a problem

GUEST COLUMNIST

A half-century has elapsed since a long forgotten American Public Information Officer in Viet Nam declared, “We had to destroy the village in order to save it.” The sheer lunacy of his remark has survived, however, as the premier example of bureaucratic policy run amuck. Democratic governments, which can only be held accountable in the final analysis by voters, have proven particularly susceptible to the seductions of groupthink enthusiasms. These fevers rarely originate internally, but, rather, they tend to be transmitted as infections germinated by legislators.

HUDSON: MEMORIES OF A GOOD MAN

Ted Strickland was a public servant, in the very best sense, and he will be missed

The Colorado Statesman

I learned of Ted Strickland’s passing with genuine regret. He represented a generation of Republican leaders who still believed in the importance of government and the positive role it can and should play in all our lives. Unlike many in the current crop of Republican legislators, who would have Colorado voters believe government is our enemy — that a return to frontier anarchy would constitute a net social improvement, Ted understood that, when properly channeled, government significantly improves the quality of life in Colorado. That doesn’t mean he wasn’t a conservative.

HUDSON: !!!URGENT —- DIVINE GUIDANCE ALERT!!!

Contributing Columnist

March 1, 2012
Elysian Fields, Heaven

CONFIDENTIAL MEMORANDUM/(PTR – 030112-001C)

Fm: St. Peter, Gatekeeper
To: All Archangels, Administrative Law Angels and Entrance Referees

Re: Tempering Mercy and Andrew Breitbart

HUDSON: LOYALTY VS. CHAOS THEORY

How long can troops remain loyal to a leader who shows little loyalty towards them?

GUEST COLUMNIST

During the Watergate fiasco, one interview stamped itself on my memory. Larry O’Brien was the national chairman of the Democratic Party, and it was his office that was broken into my Richard Nixon’s “plumbers.” O’Brien had a long political career in Massachusetts which concluded with his appointment as the manager for both John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson’s presidential campaigns. Johnson had rewarded him with an appointment as U. S. Postmaster General.

HUDSON: SURREAL NATURE OF REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN HITS HOME

Look at history when comparing successes of Republican and Democratic presidencies

The Colorado Statesman

It’s easy to lose track of how short American history really is in the grander scheme of things. My grandfather was born in 1881 and his father and many of his uncles were Civil War combat veterans. During their childhoods, they, in turn, had met veterans of the American War for Independence. Both these struggles seemed as distant as the Crusades when I was in school. Yet, my grandfather was a very real presence in my life for whom I named my own son. Byron Howard taught me how to play baseball and he continued to play first base himself with an industrial league team in St. Louis well into his 70s.

HUDSON: MERIT-BASED CIVIL SERVICE ASSURES SMART GOVERNMENT

State bureaucrats once again dodged meaningful analysis of compensation issues

GUEST COLUMNIST

The Hickenlooper administration raised several hundred thousand dollars in order to survey state employees about their jobs. The results are now summarized on the Department of Personnel and Administration’s (DPA) website. It’s a good thing taxpayer dollars weren’t wasted on this effort. The questions read like they were dreamed up at a blissed out, New Age smoke-in. The only interesting response is the 58 percent of state workers who indicate they are seriously considering quitting during the next 12 months.

HUDSON: NUMBERS HIT HOME

‘Going big’ could mean a big budget mess

GUEST COLUMNIST

Rarely do the media, nor do our politicians in Washington, present financial data in a format that actually communicates the jaw-dropping reality of our federal budget mess. It’s proven easier to talk about “going big,” the euphemism du jour for attempting to legislate a fix which reduces budget deficits to zero within fifteen or twenty years. Easier still, was pointing fingers during the Congressional Super Committee’s recent failure to identify $1.2 trillion in spending cuts over the next dozen years. Lets chart the current fiscal position of every American before proceeding.

HUDSON: REMEMBRANCES OF A LEGISLATIVE FORCE

Freda Poundstone played her politics as a full contact sport — rugby not badminton

GUEST COLUMNIST

When I was sworn into the Colorado Legislature in January 1979, whether one loved her or feared her, everyone at the State Capitol knew Freda Poundstone. As a Denver Democrat, I arrived abundantly aware that she was particularly reviled for her Poundstone Amendment to the Colorado constitution. She had, nearly single-handedly, applied the brakes to Denver’s long running annexation binges of the ‘50s and ‘60s. Freda’s critics liked to portray her as a bigot, viscerally opposed to the court ordered school busing imposed on Denver’s public schools.