Miller Hudson

HUDSON: WHAT’S WRONG WITH LEAVING GOOD ENOUGH ALONE?

Pinnacol’s golden goose: When unintended consequences produce a windfall

Contributing Columnist

It will soon be two years since Channel 7’s Tony Kovaleski ambushed the Executive Director and several of Pinnacol’s Board members at the Pebble Beach resort, living the lush life of the 1% — green fees, spa treatments, luxury suites, first class airfare and gourmet meals.

HUDSON: HE WAS A MAN WITH A BIG HEART AND GENEROUS SPIRIT

Bledsoe understood the Legislature better than anyone else at the Capitol

Contributing Columnist

Whenever politicians step into mud puddles of their own making, wags are quick to label them as “poster boys or girls” for term limits. Carl “Bev” Bledsoe, to his credit, was a poster boy for the advantages of seniority and lengthy legislative service. There simply aren’t adequate adjectives to characterize his political skills. Bev was a shrewd and wily partisan, to be sure, but he was also ready to craft a compromise when circumstances demanded. His decade as Speaker of the Colorado House earned him respect, if not exactly affection, along both sides of the aisle.

HUDSON: THE DAY OF RECKONING LIES AHEAD

Republican “liberty” concerns unfortunately don’t seem to extend to actual people

Contributing Columnist

During its Extraordinary Special Session, House Republicans in the Colorado Legislature flubbed the opportunity to demonstrate that their opposition to the jack-booted thuggery of the ‘nanny’ state extends beyond the virtual persons constituted in corporations. Early in the regular session, they were swift to rush to the defense of oil and gas drillers unreasonably required to consult with landowners prior to invading the backyards of Colorado residents.

HUDSON: HE WAS THE CITIZEN LEADER OUR FOUNDING FATHERS IMAGINED

Paul Sandoval earned the right to have people come to him and ‘kiss his ring’

Contributing Columnist

When I was elected to the Colorado Legislature in 1978, Paul Sandoval was elected to a Senate seat. He had already served several terms in the House, where he entered as its youngest member. Aside from Santa Claus, Paul is the only person I’ve known whose eyes genuinely twinkled. Coupled with an acerbic sense of humor, every conversation with him often became something of a laugh fest. Yet, as you chuckled at his barbs, you couldn’t help wondering what he was saying about you when the opportunity arose.

HUDSON: WELCOME HOME!

Colorado Army National Guard Space Support Teams did their jobs well

Contributing Columnist

Last summer I wrote about the departure of Colorado Army National Guard Space Support Teams 15 & 28 for their active duty deployment to Afghanistan. Last week they returned home following nine months of barracks life in Kandahar and at Camp Leatherneck, respectively. Their welcoming ceremony was held in the Air and Space Museum at Petersen Air Force Base in Colorado Springs. The crowd was about half the size of the one that saw them off on the first of July, and was largely composed of family members.

HUDSON: DRIVING FAST AND SLOW ON I-70

What if this state assembly were held in Summit County in February?

GUEST COLUMNIST

As my stepson and I were traveling from Denver to Copper Mountain last week for our final ski day of the season, we completed the trip in just under 90 minutes. Lousy snow and good weather conspired to make our journey swift and relatively painless, much like most trips were when I-70 was constructed more than 40 years ago. Since a second tunnel bore enabled four traffic lanes beneath the Continental Divide there have been few changes to the highway.

HUDSON: VOTERS, DON’T BE DUPED

So-called personnel reform is a thoroughly modern solution in search of a problem

GUEST COLUMNIST

A half-century has elapsed since a long forgotten American Public Information Officer in Viet Nam declared, “We had to destroy the village in order to save it.” The sheer lunacy of his remark has survived, however, as the premier example of bureaucratic policy run amuck. Democratic governments, which can only be held accountable in the final analysis by voters, have proven particularly susceptible to the seductions of groupthink enthusiasms. These fevers rarely originate internally, but, rather, they tend to be transmitted as infections germinated by legislators.

HUDSON: MEMORIES OF A GOOD MAN

Ted Strickland was a public servant, in the very best sense, and he will be missed

The Colorado Statesman

I learned of Ted Strickland’s passing with genuine regret. He represented a generation of Republican leaders who still believed in the importance of government and the positive role it can and should play in all our lives. Unlike many in the current crop of Republican legislators, who would have Colorado voters believe government is our enemy — that a return to frontier anarchy would constitute a net social improvement, Ted understood that, when properly channeled, government significantly improves the quality of life in Colorado. That doesn’t mean he wasn’t a conservative.

HUDSON: !!!URGENT —- DIVINE GUIDANCE ALERT!!!

Contributing Columnist

March 1, 2012
Elysian Fields, Heaven

CONFIDENTIAL MEMORANDUM/(PTR – 030112-001C)

Fm: St. Peter, Gatekeeper
To: All Archangels, Administrative Law Angels and Entrance Referees

Re: Tempering Mercy and Andrew Breitbart

HUDSON: LOYALTY VS. CHAOS THEORY

How long can troops remain loyal to a leader who shows little loyalty towards them?

GUEST COLUMNIST

During the Watergate fiasco, one interview stamped itself on my memory. Larry O’Brien was the national chairman of the Democratic Party, and it was his office that was broken into my Richard Nixon’s “plumbers.” O’Brien had a long political career in Massachusetts which concluded with his appointment as the manager for both John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson’s presidential campaigns. Johnson had rewarded him with an appointment as U. S. Postmaster General.