Patrick Teegarden

TEEGARDEN: RECAP OF THE CIVIL WAR

May 1862: A Civil War status report after one year of protracted fighting

Contributing Columnist

In the coming months, I look forward to writing in more detail about 1862, including tragedies (like Antietam and Fredericksburg) and triumphs (like the Emancipation Proclamation) which are part of this year’s Sesquicentennial remembrance, as well as other core antebellum and post-bellum issues.

For this week, however, since so many readers of The Colorado Statesman are about to emerge from the “fog” of the legislative session for 2012, I though it might be helpful to provide a very brief situational report on the American Civil War as it stood 150 years ago this week, in 1862.

TEEGARDEN: MORE POLITICAL GAMES AND TRICKERY!

A look back at the Democratic and Republican National Conventions in 1860

GUEST COLUMNIST

Well folks, ‘tis the season for Presidential-year Political Conventions!

Ah yes — more political games and trickery! Smoke filled rooms, counterfeit admission tickets, well-heeled East Coast financiers trying to strong arm western voters, organized and paid shouters and cheerleaders, rumor-mongering, threats of party defections, promises of cabinet posts and other patronage in exchange for support, the raising of absurd sums of money for political action, etc, etc.

TEEGARDEN: FROM THE PAST WE SHALL (HOPEFULLY) LEARN

A reflection on Shiloh and Passover

GUEST COLUMNIST

The two-day Civil War Battle of Shiloh, sometimes referred to as the “Battle of Pittsburgh Landing,” began in the predawn hours of Sunday, April 6, 1862, when Confederate General Albert Sydney Johnston’s army rushed out of the dense woods upon the more or less unsuspecting Union army of General Ulysses S. Grant. Grant’s troops were, for the most part, just rising from their tents when the attack began.

TEEGARDEN: REMEMBRANCES OF LINCOLN ON THE OCCASION OF HIS BIRTHDAY

One more tough choice under pressure for President Abraham Lincoln

GUEST COLUMNIST

February 7, 1862 was the originally scheduled execution date for Nathaniel Gordon, a convicted trans-Atlantic slave trader. However, Gordon, the scion of a respectable Presbyterian family from Portland, Maine, had good reason to believe that neither his death sentence nor any other severe punishment would actually be carried out.

TEEGARDEN: PRESIDENT'S GENERAL WAR ORDER NO. 1

Abraham Lincoln takes charge and orders his generals to fight!

Contributing Columnist

It was 150 years ago, on January 27, 1862, that President Abraham Lincoln issued a somewhat extraordinary directive, titled “President’s General War Order No. 1.” Lincoln’s Order stemmed from both his boiling frustration with the inaction of his top generals and from his own recognition of the strategic opportunity for coordinated and simultaneous action among the Union’s various military forces.

TEEGARDEN: AND A LIST OF RECOMMENDED AUTHORS AND BOOKS

A New Years’ Eve Civil War battle

Contributing Columnist

First, following is a brief description of a very bloody and inconclusive battle (technically counted as a Union victory) known as the Battle of Stones River or Murfreesboro. Second, I’ve provided a list of my own favorite Civil War historians/non-fiction writers and some suggested (very readable, not dry and boring) books related to the Civil War and its place in our national psyche.

TEEGARDEN: THE CIVIL WAR "YEAR-END WRAP-UP"

The holiday seasons during the Civil War years were predictably somber

GUEST COLUMNIST

December is the traditional time for overall “year in review” wrap up stories. So here’s an attempt to summarize the years of the Civil War. The following is admittedly far too superficial for any historian or amateur student of that period, but will hopefully give more general readers a glimpse of the painful annual retrospectives families were somberly reflecting upon during the holiday seasons of 1860-1865.

TEEGARDEN: THANKSGIVING, VETERANS DAY, AND GETTYSBURG DAY...

Remembering why all us Turkeys stay on the same crazy bus!

GUEST COLUMNIST

Saturday, November 19, is the 148th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s 1863 delivery of the Gettysburg Address. It will likely bring a smile to the face of any admirer of Lincoln to know that the President’s first words to his friend and bodyguard, Ward Lamon, after delivering his brief remarks were, “that speech won’t scour.” Lincoln was utilizing a farmer’s vernacular for plowing untilled soil, and by “won’t scour” he meant that the speech was a dud!

TEEGARDEN: A HISTORY OF REMEMBRANCE

Trying to understand Veterans Day: What and whom are we honoring?

The Colorado Statesman

Here’s how well I understand Veterans Day — I told my publisher/editor/friend, Ms. Strogoff, how thrilled I was to write about this important national holiday, because it had in fact been originated by Civil War General and Congressman John “Blackjack” Logan. Which would have been correct if we had been talking about Memorial Day! In the immortal words of Gilda Radnor’s Emily Litella, “Never Mind.”

TEEGARDEN: FROM HAGIOGRAPHY TO HODGES

The closer we examine Abraham Lincoln, the greater he remains in our minds

GUEST COLUMNIST

Having recently discussed the bare bones story of Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, I’ve been uncertain how to best present or frame the apparent ambiguities and lack of urgency in Lincoln’s own commitment to end slavery. When studying or reading about Lincoln’s life, particularly his early career in Illinois, one cannot help but stumble across any number of troubling statements and writings with respect to true equality between the white and African American races.