Peter Marcus

Republican candidates pick on Hick

But mostly agree with each other on the main issues in the race
The Colorado Statesman

Four of Colorado’s Republican gubernatorial candidates met Wednesday evening for their first joint forum in what was a mostly cordial exchange — until the end.

Appearing in a live studio audience taping of “The Aaron Harber Show,” the four candidates — former U.S. Rep. Tom Tancredo, former Senate Minority Leader Mike Kopp, Secretary of State Scott Gessler and Sen. Greg Brophy — were asked whether they plan on pledging to maintain a polite and respectful debate throughout the primary.

‘Reform’ candidates win local school board races

But definition of reform isn’t always so clear
The Colorado Statesman

So-called “reform” school board candidates swept to victory in three Front Range school district elections this odd-year election. But how one defines “reform” is a matter of location and political perspective.

In Denver, reformers won four seats, shifting the pro-administration’s one-seat majority to a tilted six-seat majority, thereby leaving the union-backed so-called “neighborhood” advocates with little voice on the seven-member board.

Amendment 66 handily defeated

The Colorado Statesman

Republicans on Tuesday night were quick to seize the political opportunity to attack Democrats following failure of a nearly $1 billion tax increase for education reform in Colorado.

But Democrats are carefully steering clear of partisan wrangling, suggesting that Coloradans agree with the premise of Amendment 66. They just differ on how to get there.

High turnout for tax on pot

The Colorado Statesman

When Colorado voters this time last year backed legalizing recreational marijuana, Gov. John Hickenlooper had a tongue-in-cheek reply: “Federal law still says marijuana is an illegal drug, so don’t break out the Cheetos or Goldfish too quickly,” he responded, causing ire within the legalization community.

Election eve lawsuit over HB 1303 dismissed

Heart of case rested on residency requirements
The Colorado Statesman

A Denver District Court judge late Monday night dismissed a case that would have thrown a wrench into Tuesday’s election and poked holes in a recent Democratic-backed elections law that critics say disenfranchises voters.

Judge Michael Martinez said he could not find adequate evidence to indicate that House Bill 1303 — now a law — has resulted in citizens being denied the right to vote in local elections, or that voters had cast ballots in elections they were not permitted to.

GOP Walsh seeks to oust U.S. Rep. DeGette in 2014

Challenger says he wants to be “big tent” candidate
The Colorado Statesman

Denver Republicans are under no illusion that defeating Democratic U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette in 2014 will be anything but an uphill climb — to say the least.

In the heavily Democratic-leaning Congressional District 1, DeGette has reigned supreme since 1996, earning her the title of “dean” of the Colorado delegation, and a position as chief deputy whip.

EPA covers earth, wind, fire in Denver hearing

Hearing strikes discordant responses
The Colorado Statesman

A storm of environmental issues blew through Colorado this week as the Environmental Protection Agency took comments in Denver on creating strong carbon pollution standards for power plants, while the state grappled with air quality violations, devastating fires and shrinking water resources.

Interim committee seeks representation for juveniles

Critics complain it could take away parental control
The Colorado Statesman

Following revelations that an estimated 45 percent of juveniles last year in Colorado faced delinquency cases without an attorney, lawmakers this week recommended legislation to address the deficiency.

But some prosecutors and lawmakers believe requiring attorneys for a youth offender limits parental rights, which could set up a partisan fight in the legislature next year.

Coloradans get schooled on Amendment 66

Proponents raise $8 million to convince voters
The Colorado Statesman

Proponents and opponents of a $950 million tax increase for schools have kicked their campaigns into high gear, hoping to educate voters before the November bell rings on Election Day.

As voters begin to receive their ballots in the mail, proponents have been using about $10.3 million to pump out television and radio advertising, among other expenditures.

In the last fundraising period, major contributions included $1.05 million from Bloomberg Philanthropies, founded by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and $1 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Recall proponents take aim at Hudak

The Colorado Statesman

On a warm, sunny Saturday morning in early October, proponents in a quiet Arvada neighborhood are readying their campaign signs for yet another recall of a state lawmaker.

Empowered by two successful recalls over the summer that ousted the Senate president and a fellow Democratic colleague, recall proponents are energized to target another Democrat, Sen. Evie Hudak of Westminster, over her support for gun control.