Peter Marcus

Lawsuits may ensue over ballot access bill

Controversy still looms over House Bill 1036
The Colorado Statesman

Lawsuits may be on the way challenging a controversial bill signed by Gov. John Hickenlooper last Thursday that creates a separate class of the public allowed to review ballots following an election.

House Bill 1036 allows an “interested party” — including political parties and representatives of issue committees, or stakeholders involved in the outcome of an election — to examine the voted ballots, but excludes access to others, such as the press and watchdog groups.

Obama, Romney both blamed for economic plight

The Colorado Statesman

U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Cortez, joined local business owners on Monday in a press conference call for Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney, alleging that President Barack Obama’s regulatory measures have created a “hostile” workforce environment in America.

Will the third time be the charm for the Personhood initiative in Colorado?

The Colorado Statesman

Opponents of a proposed ballot initiative that would extend constitutional rights to a “person” from the moment of biological development are gearing up for their third fight against the anti-abortion so-called “Personhood” proposal, not willing to offer proponents the opportunity to say, “Third time’s the charm.”

Easier access sought for driver’s licenses

Tancredo, other opponents see politics driving the issue
The Colorado Statesman

Proponents of a ballot proposal that would offer Colorado driver’s licenses to all residents of the state whether they are a legal resident or an undocumented immigrant are busy gathering signatures despite cries that the initiative would legitimize illegal behavior.

Gun rights, property tax elimination not on ballot

The Colorado Statesman

The architects of four controversial proposed ballot initiatives that aimed to do everything from protect gun rights to eliminate property taxes in Colorado have abandoned their petition drives after lackluster fundraising and an inability to draw volunteers.

Samuel Babcock and his sister, Elise Van Grinsven — both from the Colorado Springs area — had proposed the conservative-leaning initiatives after having discussions around the “kitchen table,” according to Babcock. The initiatives would have:

Proposed ballot initiatives on water rights are swirling in controversy

The Colorado Statesman

Advocates for water belonging to the people of Colorado believe there is a rapidly growing problem in the state flowing from local and state government’s abuse of public waterways in a manner that destroys the environmental and aesthetic values of the state’s lakes, rivers, ponds and streams.

Proponents of legal pot seek voter approval

But ‘Smart Colorado’ campaign says the initiatives are dopey
The Colorado Statesman

Cannabis advocates say it is high time for recreational marijuana to be legalized in Colorado, and so they are out in full force seeking support for a ballot question that has already been certified for the November election, and collecting signatures for another two ballot proposals, all of which aim to end prohibition in the state, and perhaps begin to topple the dominoes towards federal decriminalization.

Effort to reform telecom laws met major disconnect

The Colorado Statesman

A 20-month process to reform the state’s decades-old telecommunications laws ended in political gridlock and inter-party disagreements among Senate Democrats over how to fund broadband investments in rural parts of the state.

Ballot review open only to select parties?

Hickenlooper must decide whether to veto HB 1036
The Colorado Statesman

UPDATE: This version of the story corrects an earlier version that incorrectly states "recall" law in Colorado. The corrected version states "recount" law. The Colorado Statesman regrets the error.

Gov. John Hickenlooper is weighing a controversial bill that some believe creates a separate class of the public in reviewing ballots following an election, with the aim of maintaining anonymity while also allowing for transparency.

Sine Die, for real

Now wasn’t that special?
The Colorado Statesman

Following a divisive three-day special legislative session, both sides of the political aisle licked their wounds on Wednesday as they mustered up the strength to discuss the highlights of the 2012 session. It was a respite from all the blame games and polarizing rhetoric that had held the assembly captive over the past week.