Letters to the Editor

LETTER: Neither presidential candidate deserves my money

Dear Governor Romney,

You have sent me several letters asking for money for your campaign. President Obama, I assume you have sent similar letters to Democrats.

I live in Colorado, one of the few states that can go either way in the presidential election. Because of that, each of you, and your supporters, have spent absurdly huge sums of money on television ads here, most of which tell us why we should not vote for the other guy. This would be great if I owned stock in a TV station. But I don’t.

I do not think anyone should give either of you any campaign donations. The amount of money you are spending in Colorado is evidence that neither one of you has the judgment for me to trust you with my tax dollars. It is true the money you are spending now was specifically donated for your presidential campaign. But for you to continue to ask for more demonstrates very poor judgment, which is not a characteristic I look for in a President.

One of you might still get my vote if you finally said, “enough is enough.” You have enough money to reach all the voters who wish to be reached, to state your platform, and point out your opponent’s faults. You will not ask for more, and will instead ask your supporters to make donations to the many other candidates for other offices, who help run our society, but to whom voters pay too little attention. The Republican and Democratic parties could also use more money to do a good job in their role in one of the world’s better democracies.

However, I am not expecting that to happen. Instead I am looking for a third party candidate with more conservative spending habits, even if that is only because no one is donating anything near what you two have received. Better to vote for a candidate who might be more fiscally responsible than for one of the two who have proven they are not. It is only when American voters increase the vote counts of third party candidates that Republicans and Democrats will decide that running campaigns the way they have been run in the past no longer works.

I wouldn’t give money to a person on the street with his/her hand out while liquor or cigarettes are in the other hand, demonstrating the poor choice this person would continue to make with my money. Why would I give money to a candidate with his/her hand out, while that candidate is running ads so frequently, I see at least one every time I turn on my TV, demonstrating the poor choice this candidate would continue to make with my money?

Paul Steinhauer
Denver