Current News

Cyberbullies, homemade hash oil targets of new laws taking effect

The Colorado Statesman

Crackdowns on cyberbulling and homemade hash oil are now on the books in Colorado.

The laws are among 19 new statutes that took effect July 1.

Those who are guilty of cyberbulling — harassment through interactive electronic media, such as social media — will now face up to six months behind bars.

Champion of services for children steps down

Advocacy Denver

Dr. Corry Robinson has served as Director of JFK Partners, an interdepartmental program of Pediatrics and Psychiatry at the CU School of Medicine, for the past 22 years. In this role, she provided leadership as a clinician, researcher, and educator in the fields of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorders in children. At the end of June, Dr. Robinson stepped down from as director at JFK, although still continuing in her academic appointment work and her work as principal investigator on some federally funded grant projects at the program.

Courts

Lakewood cake baker, gay couple square off before court of appeals

The Colorado Statesman

Masterpiece Cakeshop owner Jack Phillips says he was exercising his right to freedom of expression when he refused to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple, but the Colorado Civil Rights Commission called it unlawful discrimination.

So the Lakewood baker took his case to the Colorado Court of Appeals, which heard oral argument Tuesday in what has become a pivotal case nationally in the legal tug-of-war over religious freedom and same-sex marriage.

Colorado Capitol Watch

Noonan: Educators shake, rattle and retire as tremblers shudder state’s elites

Colorado Capitol Watch

Colorado is experiencing a 7.0 San Andreas earthquake with a 1906-style San Francisco fire burning through the education world. Everywhere, education leaders are retiring, quitting, or facing recalls, as education policy pushes and pulls in opposite directions.

State Education Commissioner Robert Hammond retired July 1. Other key executives and mid-level staffers quit. The Colorado Department of Education now has three interim players on its five-member executive committee, including interim commissioner Elliott Asp.

Letter to the Editor

Letter: Conservation fund a boon to state’s small businesses

Editor:

The federal Land and Water Conservation Fund, which protects our country’s public lands that create economic opportunities for small businesses, is set to expire in less than 100 days unless lawmakers act quickly to reauthorize it. Small business owners understand the connection between the preservation of public lands and their bottom lines. National parks and monuments bring tourism dollars to their businesses and attract talented employees. Many entrepreneurs start businesses in communities near public lands for these very reasons.

Guest Columnist

Meric: Pay Equity Commission sunsets as Colorado pay gap widens

Guest Contributor

The pay gap made national news after the women’s US Soccer team won the world cup. Meanwhile, a commission designed to deal with this very inequality expired in Colorado rather unceremoniously.

Jewell rejects pleas to request delay of judge's Colowyo mine order

The Colorado Statesman

Those fighting to keep open the Colowyo mine in Craig by delaying a judge’s order will have to do so without the help of the Obama administration.

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell allowed this week’s deadline to pass without filing a motion to stay the order of U.S. District Court Judge R. Brooke Jackson, who gave the department 120 days to redo parts of an eight-year-old expansion permit.

Guest Commentary

Delegation firm on finishing Aurora hospital, holding VA accountable

Special to The Colorado Statesman

Like most Coloradans, the Congressional delegation was shocked and appalled in March when the Department of Veterans Affairs first informed us the VA replacement medical center in Aurora would cost a staggering $1.73 billion. The delegation had worked together to support an $800 million facility and helped authorize funds accordingly. These cost overruns and the VA’s mismanagement of taxpayer dollars are unacceptable.

Guest Commentary

Delegation firm on finishing Aurora hospital, holding Dept. of Veterans Affairs accountable

Special to The Colorado Statesman

Like most Coloradans, the Congressional delegation was shocked and appalled in March when the Department of Veterans Affairs first informed us the VA replacement medical center in Aurora would cost a staggering $1.73 billion. The delegation had worked together to support an $800 million facility and helped authorize funds accordingly. These cost overruns and the VA’s mismanagement of taxpayer dollars are unacceptable.

Republican committee votes overwhelmingly to support House

The Colorado Statesman

A Colorado Republican Party panel voted overwhelmingly on Friday to support embattled state GOP chairman Steve House, who had been embroiled in controversy over efforts by prominent Republicans to persuade him to resign for nearly two weeks.

Following a grueling meeting that lasted more than six hours, the Colorado GOP’s state executive committee passed a motion expressing confidence in House by a vote of 22-1.

After the meeting, a relieved-looking House told reporters he was ready to move on and get to work helping elect Republicans.