Current News

Guest Commentary

Paul: Do we really need to bring back internment camps?

Guest Contributor

Last week, Retired General Wesley Clark, who was NATO commander during the U.S. bombing of Serbia, proposed that "disloyal Americans" be sent to internment camps for the "duration of the conflict." Discussing the recent military base shootings in Chattanooga, Tenn., in which five U.S. service members were killed, Clark recalled the internment of American citizens during World War II who were merely suspected of having Nazi sympathies. He said: "back then we didn't say 'that was freedom of speech,' we put him in a camp."

Letter: Bruce has a friend in governor

Editor:

Now that Douglas Bruce is out of the slammer, he needs to find new friends. He’s found at least one, our own beloved Gov. John Hickenlooper. At risk of making new enemies (lots of them), Hick has come to the rescue of Bruce by joining him in defense of the TABOR amendment.

Guest Commentary

Larson: The EPA got it right — Renewable Fuel Standard was too high

Guest Contributor

Dave Eckhardt’s letter in the July 17 Statesman, “Urge EPA to uphold RFS, because it’s working,” failed to recognize the real reason the EPA is paring down the Renewable Fuel Standard for ethanol. First and foremost, with gasoline demand in general (not of late) declining due to higher mileage gains from mandated new vehicle CAFÉ mileage standards and a lackluster economy, the petroleum industry has hit an “ethanol blend-wall,” that condition when the EPA-mandated blending levels cannot be achieved.

CSU president Frank limits use of fetal tissue, but Lamborn says it’s not enough

The Colorado Statesman

Colorado State University president Tony Frank has moved to limit the university’s use of fetal tissue following a national uproar over Planned Parenthood’s handling of post-abortion tissue and organs provided for medical research.

In a letter to Republican Rep. Doug Lamborn, Frank said he will suspend the purchase of fetal tissue for medical research from vendors such as Stem Express, which is caught up in the furor over Planned Parenthood, pending the outcome of a congressional investigation.

Guest Commentary

Balmer: Holmes trial highlights need for public defender sunshine

Guest Contributor

As People v. James Holmes, Arapahoe County Case 2012CR1522, winds down, we should reexamine sunshine disclosure rules for public defenders.

To his credit, District Attorney George Brauchler is disclosing every tax dollar his office is spending prosecuting Mr. Holmes. See the following link on his 18th Judicial website:
http://www.da18.org/DAsOffice/Finance/ArapahoeCountyCase2012CR1522.aspx.

Nevertheless, as far as I can tell, the Holmes defense team isn’t disclosing any of its expenses. Regrettably, due to loopholes in the Colorado Open Records Act, publicly funded defense lawyers are allowed to hide from taxpayers all trial costs, including high-priced consultants and expert witnesses.

Letter to the Editor

Letter: Ridiculous to call future of solar power ‘bright’

Editor:

The opening paragraph of the article, "Solar experts urge more government intervention to supplant coal power,” in the July 17 issue of The Statesman, says it all. They call for a "push from local, state and federal government." If it were such a bright idea, there would be no need to push it down the throats of the public.

Guest Commentary

Aguilar: Let’s get facts straight, not give in to scare tactics on ColoradoCare

Guest Contributor

I read with interest in the July 3 Colorado Statesman “Déjà vu all over: a preview of government-run health care,” a misleading piece about the ColoradoCare health care proposal from “guest contributor” Michael Fields. I couldn’t help wondering how many readers saw the tiny line identifying him as the Colorado state director of Americans for Prosperity, the tax-exempt, yet extremely well-funded (by the Koch brothers) right-wing organization that has consistently opposed health coverage reform — in favor of the old, unfair system that left so many Americans uninsured.

ColoradoCare backers say Title Board's $25 billion cost estimate ‘misleading,’ ponder suing

The Colorado Statesman

The group behind a proposed ballot initiative that aims to provide health care coverage for all Coloradans is considering suing the Colorado Title Board for “misleading” voters over the measure's cost.

But there is doubt as to whether organizers even have that option, especially since they did not pursue ballot language remedies in the time allowed.

Initiative 20 would create ColoradoCare, a health care cooperative that would provide coverage for everyone in the state.

Guest Commentary

Littwin: After the Lafayette shooting, the jury is still out on us

The Colorado Independent

The shooter, we’re told, was a drifter, a word you rarely hear outside Hollywood westerns. But this couldn’t be a western, because in the West, they took your guns at the town limits. Or at least that’s how they did it in the movies.

News From Yesteryear

Allard, Martinez weigh Senate bids; Hart staffers meet with 'no agenda' in Vail

The Colorado Statesman

Twenty Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … Candidates for the U.S. Senate seat up in 1996 were starting to emerge. U.S. Rep. Wayne Allard had set up shop at a Lakewood office building, smack in the middle of Jefferson County and well outside his 4th Congressional District, fueling speculation that he was planning a run for the Republican Senate nomination.