Current News

Dem chair race heats up

The Colorado Statesman

Who will chart the course?

The three candidates for chair of the Colorado Democratic Party agreed that the state party needs to chart its own course distinct from Washington, D.C., at a forum on Sunday in Denver. But the candidates disagreed sharply over whether stunning losses in last year’s election mean it’s time for a change in party leadership or that experience counts more than ever as next year’s presidential election looms.

WRIGHT: CHANGE, TRANSPARENCY AND A RENEWED EXCELLENCE IN POLITICAL REPORTING

The journey continues

The Colorado Statesman

“The only thing you can count on to stay the same is change,” my late grandfather used to tell me. I have found throughout my life that his simple analysis of the human condition has been pretty accurate.

The Colorado Statesman is a Colorado establishment — not just a news source, but an enduring institution and reliable messenger of all things politics. Founded just 39 years after Colorado’s first newspaper, the since-closed Rocky Mountain News, The Statesman is one of our state’s most enduring news franchises.

GOP: ‘High stakes’ battle for state leadership

The Colorado Statesman

More than 75 die-hard conservatives braved a blizzard on Wednesday night to hear Colorado Republican Party chair Ryan Call, who is seeking a third term heading the party, and his challenger, former gubernatorial candidate Steve House, discuss their visions for the GOP at a forum in Greenwood Village.

Reactions mixed to task force recs

The Colorado Statesman

The task force established by Gov. John Hickenlooper last summer to resolve conflicts between the oil and gas industry, local governments and environmentalists over drilling in Colorado voted Tuesday to deliver a handful of proposals to the governor but fell short of producing the sweeping compromise some had anticipated.

Legislative Brief

The Colorado Statesman

Follow up:

Bill deadlines — Wednesday marks the first deadline for bills to move out of their original chambers, unless they are granted late bill status or otherwise had deadlines extended. This session looks to be off to a slow start in getting bills to the governor, highlighting the divisive nature of this year’s General Assembly.

HUDSON: DOES THE SENATE MAJORITY HAVE A STRATEGY?

Sen. Bill Cadman’s House of Cards

Contributing Columnist

If you’ve been watching “House of Cards” on Netflix, you might be misled to believe legislative politics requires sophisticated strategic planning. Alas, this is rarely the case. In most instances, our solons make it up as they move along — playing their cards pretty much when and as they are dealt. If that strikes you as shortsighted, you wouldn’t be wrong. NFL coaches earn millions of dollars for developing winning game plans.

Growing marijuana industry embraces regulations

The Colorado Statesman

“We want to regulate our industry.”

Have you ever heard a businessperson utter those words?

Regis Groff memorialized at state Capitol

The Colorado Statesman

“This is an example of a life well-led….”

The Colorado State Senate on Wednesday memorialized the life and service of one of the titans of the state Senate in the 20th century, former Sen. Regis Groff, who passed away in October at the age of 79.

Groff served 20 years in the Senate, from 1975 to 1994, including four years as minority leader.
Wednesday’s memorial saw a long line of current and former legislators eager to share their memories of Groff and the impact he had on Colorado.

House kicks immigrant driver’s license fight back to Senate

The Colorado Statesman

The Democratic-led House on Wednesday sent a supplemental bill back to the Republican-led Senate that will start another round of dueling press releases around ideological differences over driver’s licenses for undocumented immigrants.

HUDSON: TWEEDLE DEE OR TWEEDLE DUM?

State chairs: highly qualified to herd ungrateful cats

Contributing Columnist

Four years ago both the Colorado Republican and Democratic Parties elected unusually young chairmen. Historically, both parties often turned to senior donors or business heavyweights for whom this recognition was, in part, a reward for long service and/or a readiness to pull out their own checkbooks in support of party candidates.