Current News

This week's political cartoon

'At least I have insurance now, right?'

The Colorado Statesman

Rep. Nordberg, GOP lawmakers call for state investigation into local Planned Parenthood affiliates

The Colorado Statesman

Thirty Colorado Republican legislators called Wednesday for a state investigation into Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains and whether it is involved in “the sale and transfer of fetal body parts.”

“A civilized society cannot allow unethical and illegal medical practices such as the harvesting of aborted human organs and babies for monetary gain. I would hope that even proponents of abortion would agree to that much,” said state Rep. Dan Nordberg, R-Colorado Springs, in a press release.

Letter to the Editor

Letter to Dr. Wolk: Investigate Colorado Planned Parenthood affiliates for illicit activities

Dr. Larry Wolk
Executive Director and Chief Medical Officer
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Dear Dr. Wolk,

Videos recently released by the Center for Medical Progress (CMP) have surfaced showing barbaric, unethical and potentially illegal actions relating to the trafficking and sale of aborted babies, the human organs of aborted babies and other aborted baby body parts by some Planned Parenthood Federation of America affiliates; including Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains right here in Colorado.

Coffman throws down in preview of campaign against Carroll

The Colorado Statesman

U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman, an Aurora Republican, previewed his campaign against Democratic challenger state Sen. Morgan Carroll on Sunday at the sixth annual summer barbecue fundraiser thrown by Jim and Joy Hoffman at their Greenwood Village home.

“The challenges going forward, it’s going to be tough,” Coffman told the crowd of some 250 supporters. “But I want to continue as the only veteran in the Colorado delegation, as the only member of Congress to have served in both Iraq wars.”

Chatter

Denver tops list as best city in the West, also ranks near top of Glenn Beck's cities to avoid 'like the plague'

Denver is the best place to live in the West, according to a ranking released this week by Money Magazine, but conservative gadfly Glenn Beck places the city near the bottom, on his list of cities to “avoid like the plague.”

Dubbing the Mile High City “a mecca for millenials,” Money says the “chemically induced Rocky Mountain high factor” — legalized marijuana, in the local parlance — isn’t the main reason. “You have real, legitimate urban living, then 45 minutes away you have back-packing, biking, or you can be scaling a 14,000 foot mountain,” says CU Denver professor Ken Schroeppel.

Bennet to introduce Senate version of Polis wilderness bill

The Colorado Statesman

U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet on Wednesday announced he’ll introduce a bill this session to protect more than 58,000 acres of public land in Eagle and Summit counties as wilderness.

Bennet made the announcement at a press event in Breckenridge attended by local politicians, area residents and business leaders. The Continental Divide Wilderness and Recreation Act will be the Senate version of bill introduced earlier this in the House by Rep. Jared Polis, D-Boulder.

Activists tweak message, timing in latest anti-fracking ballot fight

The Colorado Statesman

Activists will take another crack at passing the Colorado Community Rights Amendment, a proposed ballot initiative designed to give localities a veto over corporate activity, starting with the oil and gas industry.

If all that sounds familiar, it’s because a virtually identical measure, also sponsored by Coloradans for Community Rights, failed to collect enough signatures to qualify for the ballot last year. Even so, organizers say they are optimistic about their chances of bringing the measure before voters in November 2016.

Colorado Dems back mining reform, GOP focused on Good Samaritan law

The Colorado Statesman

Two weeks after the Environmental Protection Agency and contract workers accidentally released 3 million gallons of acid mine waste into the Animas River, federal lawmakers are gearing up for a deluge of debate over how best to solve the problem of thousands of abandoned mines leaching into watersheds all over the West.

Experts on mine waste cleanup efforts expect renewed interest in U.S. Rep. Raul Grijalva’s Hardrock Mining Reform and Reclamation Act of 2015, introduced by the Arizona Democrat in January and languishing in committee since February.

Letter to the Editor

Letter: Natural gas plays central role in reducing CO2 emissions

An open letter to Dr. Larry Wolk of the Colorado Department of Health & Environment

Dear Dr. Wolk:

On August 3rd, President Obama and EPA announced the Clean Power Plan Rule. The rule requires the U.S. power sector to cut carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 32 percent in 2030 from 2005 levels. The only mention of natural gas during the release of this plan established a disappointing false choice between clean-burning natural gas and renewables. However, we believe, and government data supports the fact, that natural gas has played and will continue to play a central role in reducing CO2 emissions quickly, cost-effectively, and safely.

Low-income housing efforts get boost, but demand remains high

The Colorado Statesman

More than $5 million in tax credits have been awarded in Colorado this year for the construction of special housing projects for the homeless and others in need.

Those incentives were among a larger pool of allocated tax credits aimed at increasing low-income housing availability in the state.

But officials tasked with creating more permanent housing opportunities for low-income residents acknowledge the state has a long way to go to meet a demand that is increasing in the face of skyrocketing rents across the state.