Current News

Reactions mixed to task force recs

The Colorado Statesman

The task force established by Gov. John Hickenlooper last summer to resolve conflicts between the oil and gas industry, local governments and environmentalists over drilling in Colorado voted Tuesday to deliver a handful of proposals to the governor but fell short of producing the sweeping compromise some had anticipated.

Legislative Brief

The Colorado Statesman

Follow up:

Bill deadlines — Wednesday marks the first deadline for bills to move out of their original chambers, unless they are granted late bill status or otherwise had deadlines extended. This session looks to be off to a slow start in getting bills to the governor, highlighting the divisive nature of this year’s General Assembly.


Sen. Bill Cadman’s House of Cards

Contributing Columnist

If you’ve been watching “House of Cards” on Netflix, you might be misled to believe legislative politics requires sophisticated strategic planning. Alas, this is rarely the case. In most instances, our solons make it up as they move along — playing their cards pretty much when and as they are dealt. If that strikes you as shortsighted, you wouldn’t be wrong. NFL coaches earn millions of dollars for developing winning game plans.

Growing marijuana industry embraces regulations

The Colorado Statesman

“We want to regulate our industry.”

Have you ever heard a businessperson utter those words?

Regis Groff memorialized at state Capitol

The Colorado Statesman

“This is an example of a life well-led….”

The Colorado State Senate on Wednesday memorialized the life and service of one of the titans of the state Senate in the 20th century, former Sen. Regis Groff, who passed away in October at the age of 79.

Groff served 20 years in the Senate, from 1975 to 1994, including four years as minority leader.
Wednesday’s memorial saw a long line of current and former legislators eager to share their memories of Groff and the impact he had on Colorado.

House kicks immigrant driver’s license fight back to Senate

The Colorado Statesman

The Democratic-led House on Wednesday sent a supplemental bill back to the Republican-led Senate that will start another round of dueling press releases around ideological differences over driver’s licenses for undocumented immigrants.


State chairs: highly qualified to herd ungrateful cats

Contributing Columnist

Four years ago both the Colorado Republican and Democratic Parties elected unusually young chairmen. Historically, both parties often turned to senior donors or business heavyweights for whom this recognition was, in part, a reward for long service and/or a readiness to pull out their own checkbooks in support of party candidates.

After midterm autopsy, Colorado and national Democrats scramble to realign message

The Colorado Statesman

When Sen. Cory Gardner unseated Democratic incumbent Mark Udall in the 2014 midterm elections, he was the first challenger to boot a sitting Colorado U.S. senator out of office since 1978. The highly competitive race topped priority lists on both sides of the aisle. But on election night, only the Republican camp celebrated. Not only did Gardner pull off the upset. A majority of races south of the Gardner/Udall contest on the ballot also went into the conservative column.

After dominating Colorado politics for most of the 2000s, Democrats had to ask themselves: How did we get here?

Letter: The “economy doesn’t work that way”, Mr. President.

Dear Editor,

President Obama spoke in his State of the Union address of the need to shape a new, “middle class economics” for America. Then he introduced his budget, which contained a host of tax increases that would pound the middle class.

His budget raises taxes on oil and gas companies by $44 billion. Plenty of people in Congress share his view that average Americans will be helped if “the rich” or “big corporations” are made to pay confiscatory tax rates. But the economy doesn’t work that way.