Current News

Cynthia Coffman tapped ‘Best Public Sector Lawyer’

The Colorado Statesman

Chief Deputy Attorney General Cynthia Coffman didn’t even know that she was being considered for Law Week Colorado’s award this year for best public sector lawyer, but when she found out that she’d been tapped for the honor, she viewed it as a warm recognition of her 15 years of public service.

“It’s an affirmation for my career…” Coffman acknowledged. “This feels personal, and something I have earned through a lot of years of working in the public sector. So, it has special meaning for that very reason.”

“Obamacare” blamed for war on religion

The Colorado Statesman

Conservative activists were told on Oct. 4 that liberals have waged a war on religious freedom that has been promulgated by President Barack Obama’s health care law.

The message came during a session of the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) Colorado event held at the Crowne Plaza Denver International Airport earlier this month. Titled, “Keeping the Faith: The Left’s War on Religious Freedom,” local and national conservative stalwarts made the case for repealing so-called “Obamacare” in the name of religious freedom.

Buck chimes in on Obama’s fast and furious disregard for rule of law

The Colorado Statesman

President Barack Obama and his administration have run afoul of the nation’s rule of law, which has been highlighted by the controversial gun-trafficking operation into Mexico known as Fast and Furious, conservatives were told on Oct. 4 at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Colorado.

Colorado’s Senators warn of Romney’s budget proposals

Udall, Bennet cite ‘devastating’ effects
The Colorado Statesman

Colorado’s two senators — both Democrats — sounded the alarm over Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s budget policies on Monday, warning that his proposals would be “devastating” to key industries and populations in the state.

“For months, we here in Colorado have watched this campaign unfold, and now it’s time to make our voices heard. As we cast our votes, it’s really important to understand what’s at stake,” said U.S. Sen. Mark Udall, who joined fellow senator Michael Bennet at a press conference at an Obama campaign office near the University of Denver.

Gessler continues to stir things up

Secretary of State accuses opponents of playing race card
The Colorado Statesman

Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler told a national conservative audience in Denver last Thursday that those on the left only pretend to care about vote fraud but are only interested in stirring up anger against conservatives to win votes when they “demagogue” the issue. What’s more, he said, his political opponents are happy to play “the racism card, and they are more than willing to lie to do this.”

Civility marks this hot-button race for DA

Special to The Colorado Statesman

The cataract of special interest money released by the U.S. Supreme Court’s Citizen’s United, decision has subjected Americans to a staggering assault of negative advertising and character assassination. But candidates for District Attorney in the 18th Judicial District offered an island of civility in this river of vilification on Sept. 26 when they faced off at the South Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce.

American Constitution Party feels majorly scorned by Tancredo

The Colorado Statesman

The leader of the Arvada-based American Constitution Party says it has seen little benefit to becoming a major party in Colorado following former Congressman Tom Tancredo’s unsuccessful gubernatorial run in 2010.

Doug “Dayhorse” Campbell, state chairman of the American Constitution Party (ACN), says Tancredo may have propelled his political organization to major party status by running on their ticket, but he is disappointed that the former congressman so quickly abandoned ship.

Energy debate pits Peña, Owens as stand-ins for the Obama and Romney campaigns

The Colorado Statesman

Former Denver Mayor Federico Peña, a Democrat, and former Gov. Bill Owens, a Republican, served as surrogates for President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney, respectively, on Tuesday, painting stark differences between the two candidates on energy issues.

The debate on the Auraria campus was sponsored by the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce and industry stakeholders, from oil and gas proponents as well as those serving the alternative side of the energy industry, including solar and wind resources.

Campaigns get traction on local campaign trail

The Colorado Statesman

In the aftermath of a debate in Denver last week that both sides agree dealt a setback to President Barack Obama’s campaign, Democrats launched a star-studded tour of the state in a final push to register voters, while Republican Mitt Romney’s campaign, buoyed by increasingly favorable poll results, exulted in a surge of volunteers that organizers predicted would presage a GOP victory.

First presidential debate bypassed important issues, some complain

The Colorado Statesman

When the first presidential debate of the fall election was over, and the myriad of media cameras that had descended on Denver left town, advocates for an assortment of polarizing issues wondered why the two major party candidates hadn’t addressed their concerns.

Despite having the help of high-profile politicos from Colorado and across the nation who had all landed in Denver for the debate on Oct. 3, advocates for issues such as mass transit, gun control, climate change, banking reform and immigration couldn’t believe that the first debate left these topics largely untouched.