Guest Columns

TEEGARDEN: ABRAHAM LINCOLN, MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. AND KEN SALAZAR…

January reflections on three Americans — two for the ages, one still belongs to Colorado

Contributing Columnist

January (1st) marks the 150th Anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, by America’s greatest President, Abraham Lincoln. Make no mistake, and ignore criticism to the contrary — this one act by Lincoln (combined with winning the Civil War, of course) had more to do with the elimination of America’s Original Sin of Slavery than any other in history, including passage of the 13th Amendment.

STYLE MATTERS

Stars of the West Shine at Citizen of the West Dinner

Contributing Columnist

HUDSON: CAN’T PUT A SILENCER ON MY THOUGHTS

No dragnet will catch every madman with a gun, but there is no excuse for not trying

Contributing Columnist

Only a fool bothers to write about guns in America. However polarized Congress may be today, firearms define a public fault line where passions bubble furiously along both sides of the divide. It’s nearly impossible to propose a middle course that doesn’t invite vituperative attacks from both gun nuts and their opponents. But, after the recent slaughter of schoolchildren in Connecticut, only the latest of many similar incidents reaching far back beyond Columbine, I am willing to play the fool. To remain silent would be, to some degree, to become complicit in the next massacre of innocents.

THE WEBBCAST: EGGNOG CONVERSATION

Aggravations — thing one and two. Elected officials, TV newscasters beware.

Contributing Columnist

It’s totally embarrassing when someone says, “I read your column, it always makes sense, what are you writing about next?” and I don’t have a new idea in mind. This has happened fairly frequently lately (I must be spending too much time at holiday parties), but I’ve developed two topics as a result of recent experiences. And without channeling the bite of Gene Amole, both are aggravating and difficult to solve. With apologies to Dr. Seuss:

HUDSON: THERE ARE PROMISES & THEN THERE ARE PROMISES

How GOP Art Herzberger helped me create Colorado’s first medical marijuana program

Contributing Columnist

Every political candidate, irrespective of party, is frequently asked whether they will support or oppose various policies or spending priorities. Many of these queries are easy to answer, while others produce the kind of evasiveness demonstrated by Florida’s Republican Senator Marco Rubio, who was recently asked how old he thought the Earth was. His reply that he is not a scientist was a transparent dodge, and not a very artful one at that. Whenever public discussions stray into the realm of moral values and religious beliefs, politicians are quick to crank up their fog machines.

WEBB: IN DEFENSE OF A GOOD WOMAN

Attacks on UN Ambassador Susan Rice should be denounced as cowardly

GUEST COLUMNIST

As a former delegate to the United Nations, I have been especially dismayed by the personal attacks of some Republican critics against UN Ambassador Susan Rice and her comments shortly after the Sept. 11 Benghazi attack.

I saw firsthand in 2009 how Rice and her staff work with information coming through Washington in the most thorough and thoughtful way. As President Obama has strongly defended, Rice’s comments were based on intelligence that she had received and what the administration knew at the time.

SMITH: THE VIEW FROM SPAIN

Our presidential election elicits impassioned responses from citizens abroad

Contributing Columnist

“Unemployment brings misery,” says José Luis Galván. He’s a fisherman and we’re at the edge of the Guadalquivir River near the town of Sanlúcar de Barrameda in southern Spain. Columbus sailed from here on his third voyage and in 1519 Magellan left Sanlúcar to circle the globe. Now it’s a small town known for seafood and wines.

TEEGARDEN: A MOVIE REVIEW BY A LINCOLN DEVOTEE

The movie Lincoln is almost as satisfying as reading “Team of Rivals”

Contributing Columnist

Last week, my friend and colleague, Doug Young, wrote a brilliant review of the recently released Stephen Spielberg film, Lincoln. As follow up, I have three enthusiastic recommendations: First, go see the movie. Second, take 5-10 minutes to read the actual texts of Abraham Lincoln’s two greatest speeches, the Gettysburg Address (November 19, 1863) and his Second Inaugural Address (March 4, 1865). Third, with both the movie and Lincoln’s poetic prose fresh in your mind, read or re-read Mr. Young’s review in the November 23 edition of The Colorado Statesman.