Guest Columns

JONAS: OUR POLITICS CAN CHANGE

Americans Elect represents a real chance to re-boot presidential politics in 2012

GUEST COLUMNIST

Still fourteen months away, the 2012 presidential election is heating up faster and more furious than most anyone would want. Stuck with a stagnant economy and jobs market, skyrocketing debts and deficits, failing schools and crumbling infrastructure, Washington’s focus has turned to bickering about elections instead of getting anything done.

President Obama, with an eye towards November 2012, spins every speech into an “us” vs. “them” appeal in hopes of holding his base.

BROWN: COURTESY COUNTS — TOWARDS CONSTITUENTS TOO

Proposal to ban texting at public meetings a result of rude behavior by Council colleagues

GUEST COLUMNIST

It’s another Monday night meeting of the Denver City Council. Dozens of citizens have gathered in the ornate council chamber on the fourth floor of the City and County building for a controversial public hearing. It’s a time honored tradition (mandated for land use issues) that gives interested constituents three minutes at the podium to speak directly to elected officials and tell them what’s on their minds.

HOLDEN: OUT OF CONTROL

Public sector attrition a “simple solution” to Colorado’s continuing budget woes

GUEST COLUMNIST

The University of Colorado increased tuition 9 percent earlier this year. University officials seem to say their numerous revenue sources — student tuition, state funding, foundations, corporate and federal grants, alumni contributions and more — are not enough. Colorado higher education is an easy target for budget cutting, but increased tuition will result in fewer students able to afford college.

It’s a small part of a larger problem.

TEEGARDEN: GRUESOME AND SOBERING STATISTICS FROM 1862

Single day of fighting in Civil War resulted in twice the deaths from terrorists of 9/11

Contributing Columnist

September 17, 1862 was the bloodiest single day in U. S. history-by a long shot.

Total deaths — the worst. Total casualties (killed, wounded and missing) — the worst. Deaths and total casualties adjusted as a percentage of total population — worse yet!

TEEGARDEN: FROM BULL RUN THROUGH BULL RUN

13 months of Yankee ineptitude and defeat

Contributing Columnist

This past week, Aug. 30 marked the 149th anniversary of the Union’s second consecutive defeat at Bull Run. But Union futility on the fields of Virginia over this 14-month stretch was more pathetic than the record might indicate. The Yankee losing streak that had begun on the same battlefield the previous year, in July 1861, included repeated losses on battlefields between Washington and Richmond and up and down the Shenandoah Valley. Then, on Sept.

GALLAGHER: WHAT ABOUT HISTORICAL HERITAGE AND WELFARE OF DENVER TAXPAYERS?

Stock Show should not be sold down the river because of Gaylord’s over-arching greed

GUEST COLUMNIST

I will oppose any move of the National Western Stock Show that will damage the City and County of Denver, its citizens and taxpayers, downtown business, our Convention Center and/or the Denver Coliseum. As Auditor I will continue to protect the interests of Denver and its citizens and I will fight any move by the National Western that has a negative impact on them. It will not happen on my watch!

COFFMAN: UNFUNDED FEDERAL MANDATE IS TOO COSTLY

Washington bureaucrats shouldn’t decide who uses bilingual ballots

GUEST COLUMNIST

The right to vote is sacred. When I was the Colorado Secretary of State I worked hard to make sure that every U.S. citizen who called our state home and had the legal right to cast a ballot was afforded the opportunity to do so, but I fail to see how a portion of the 1973 Voting Rights Act contributes to that by forcing an increasing number of local governments to use bilingual ballots all across the United States.

TEEGARDEN: CIVIL WAR GENERALS, PART 3

Civil War Generals Grant, Sherman and the Western Theater of War

Contributing Columnist

The Civil War battle resulting in the Union capture of Fort Donelson, in northern Tennessee, is not nearly as well known as it ought to be, given the eclectic cast of characters serving as general officers who played a role there. But most notably, it was during the preparation for and execution of this campaign that the men who would come to be celebrated as the Union’s two greatest generals began working together.

THE WEBBCAST: AMY STEPHENS DESERVES BETTER

Standing in a circle, and firing at will

Special to The Colorado Statesman

The past month’s spectacle of Congress struggling with a debt ceiling limit, and the compromises over tax increases, cuts in government spending, and the anguished rhetoric, also highlighted a unique feature of partisan politics — the ability of party members to turn upon themselves.

This phenomenon manifests itself with a peculiar exercise in which dueling party members figuratively stand in a circle and fire pistols at each other. Some fall dead, others are wounded, and no one really wins the duel.

LUNDBERG: SO MUCH FOR CUTTING RED TAPE

Colorado’s rule-making bureaucracy needs more than a timeout

GUEST COLUMNIST

When John Hickenlooper was inaugurated as Governor in of Colorado, I was encouraged by the focused attention he gave to controlling the costs and intrusiveness of regulations on the businesses and people of Colorado. Despite our political differences in other areas, I thought we had a common understanding and common interest in reducing the heavy hand of government regulation.