Guest Columns

TEEGARDEN: FROM HAGIOGRAPHY TO HODGES

The closer we examine Abraham Lincoln, the greater he remains in our minds

GUEST COLUMNIST

Having recently discussed the bare bones story of Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, I’ve been uncertain how to best present or frame the apparent ambiguities and lack of urgency in Lincoln’s own commitment to end slavery. When studying or reading about Lincoln’s life, particularly his early career in Illinois, one cannot help but stumble across any number of troubling statements and writings with respect to true equality between the white and African American races.

SMITH: FREE TRADE, INTERNATIONAL TOURISM ARE KEY

Even so-called ‘small accomplishments’ will help with job creation in Colorado

“I’m less enamoured with big plans than I am with small accomplishments,” Monte Pascoe whispered to me during a cabinet meeting way back in 1982 when we were both working for Governor Dick Lamm.

Monte was a wonderful public servant and civic leader and I thought of him as President Obama was making his September 8 jobs speech. Yes, big ideas are important and often inspiring but rebuilding our shattered economy is going to take dozens of small accomplishments. There is no magic answer.

SPRADLEY: ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL

If the government makes me buy health insurance, what’s next?

GUEST COLUMNIST

I read with interest Miller Hudson’s article on health insurance and OBAMACARE (Colorado Statesman, Sept. 30, 2011) and could not help myself but submit a response. In my opinion, there are many fatal flaws with his logic. The critically ill do not go uncared for in America today, they are cared for either at the hospital, at community health centers or on a cash basis. Yes, you can still buy health care services with money.

TEEGARDEN: LINCOLN'S EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION

Beginning of the end of slavery in the Union

Contributing Columnist

On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln publicly announced his intention to issue the Emancipation Proclamation, effective on January 1, 1863. Under the terms of this Presidential Order, any area in a state of rebellion against the Union would immediately forfeit the institution of “legal” slavery without compensation.

JONAS: OUR POLITICS CAN CHANGE

Americans Elect represents a real chance to re-boot presidential politics in 2012

GUEST COLUMNIST

Still fourteen months away, the 2012 presidential election is heating up faster and more furious than most anyone would want. Stuck with a stagnant economy and jobs market, skyrocketing debts and deficits, failing schools and crumbling infrastructure, Washington’s focus has turned to bickering about elections instead of getting anything done.

President Obama, with an eye towards November 2012, spins every speech into an “us” vs. “them” appeal in hopes of holding his base.

BROWN: COURTESY COUNTS — TOWARDS CONSTITUENTS TOO

Proposal to ban texting at public meetings a result of rude behavior by Council colleagues

GUEST COLUMNIST

It’s another Monday night meeting of the Denver City Council. Dozens of citizens have gathered in the ornate council chamber on the fourth floor of the City and County building for a controversial public hearing. It’s a time honored tradition (mandated for land use issues) that gives interested constituents three minutes at the podium to speak directly to elected officials and tell them what’s on their minds.

HOLDEN: OUT OF CONTROL

Public sector attrition a “simple solution” to Colorado’s continuing budget woes

GUEST COLUMNIST

The University of Colorado increased tuition 9 percent earlier this year. University officials seem to say their numerous revenue sources — student tuition, state funding, foundations, corporate and federal grants, alumni contributions and more — are not enough. Colorado higher education is an easy target for budget cutting, but increased tuition will result in fewer students able to afford college.

It’s a small part of a larger problem.

TEEGARDEN: GRUESOME AND SOBERING STATISTICS FROM 1862

Single day of fighting in Civil War resulted in twice the deaths from terrorists of 9/11

Contributing Columnist

September 17, 1862 was the bloodiest single day in U. S. history-by a long shot.

Total deaths — the worst. Total casualties (killed, wounded and missing) — the worst. Deaths and total casualties adjusted as a percentage of total population — worse yet!

TEEGARDEN: FROM BULL RUN THROUGH BULL RUN

13 months of Yankee ineptitude and defeat

Contributing Columnist

This past week, Aug. 30 marked the 149th anniversary of the Union’s second consecutive defeat at Bull Run. But Union futility on the fields of Virginia over this 14-month stretch was more pathetic than the record might indicate. The Yankee losing streak that had begun on the same battlefield the previous year, in July 1861, included repeated losses on battlefields between Washington and Richmond and up and down the Shenandoah Valley. Then, on Sept.

GALLAGHER: WHAT ABOUT HISTORICAL HERITAGE AND WELFARE OF DENVER TAXPAYERS?

Stock Show should not be sold down the river because of Gaylord’s over-arching greed

GUEST COLUMNIST

I will oppose any move of the National Western Stock Show that will damage the City and County of Denver, its citizens and taxpayers, downtown business, our Convention Center and/or the Denver Coliseum. As Auditor I will continue to protect the interests of Denver and its citizens and I will fight any move by the National Western that has a negative impact on them. It will not happen on my watch!