Guest Columns

MAMET: ALL POLITICS IS LOCAL

More than 40 municipal elections scheduled

GUEST COLUMNIST

The Colorado Municipal League (CML), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization established in 1923 that represents the interests of 265 cities and towns, anticipates that at least 43 cities and towns throughout the state will be holding regular or special elections next month. What follows is a summary of some of them.

HUDSON: WHY LIMIT PROMOTIONS TO ASS-KISSERS AND UNCTUOUS FLATTERERS?

Amendment S — It’s like a Trojan horse masquerading as a carousel pony

GUEST COLUMNIST

The American Constitution is admired for its introduction of checks and balances among the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government. The opportunity for obstruction and delay this creates has frustrated reformers of every stripe, yet it was the stated intention of our founding fathers that they should guard public policy against the popular whims of impassioned zealotry. Three independent, competing centers of power were meant to serve as a brake on precipitous change.

HUDSON: LEGACY OF FIREFIGHTING PROFESSIONAL WON'T EASILY BE SNUFFED OUT

Randy Atkinson was admired from both sides of the aisle

Contributing Columnist

Randy Atkinson has been hanging around the Legislature for so many years it’s difficult to accept the fact he won’t be back for the next session. His death at 60 caught both friends and foes by surprise. President of the Colorado Professional Firefighters Association since 2006, Randy has been the lobbying voice of firefighters for more than thirty years. Outside of fire stations, there probably isn’t one Coloradan in a hundred who has ever heard of him. But, Atkinson was one of the most influential backroom politicians in our state.

STYLE MATTERS: FALL FASHION TIPS

Contributing Columnist

HUDSON: TRYING TO MAKE CENTS IN POLITICS

Question for politicos: How did those guys do it? — Wives who pay the bills!

Contributing Columnist

The average American President serves 14 years in public office before ascending to the White House. When some of those years involve service in a state legislature or as a county commissioner, you should figure they probably weren’t the primary breadwinner in their families. Politicians may dress well, by and large, but local elected office doesn’t pay well, while campaigns have become increasingly expensive. Voters generally don’t consider how their leaders can afford to run a campaign or serve in office, when elected. I suspect most Coloradans would be surprised to learn that Bill Ritter liquidated much of his retirement savings to cover family expenses when he ran for Governor in 2006. There is a reason why Dan Maes was using mileage reimbursements to make mortgage expenses in 2010. Any candidacy generally requires a significant element of self-financing even if that contribution is foregone income.

SMITH: REMEMBERING OUR PAST

Allen Dines hasn’t slowed down a bit

Contributing Columnist

Allen Dines
Colorado House of Representatives 1956-1966
Colorado Senate 1966-1974

HUDSON: SETTING SIGHTS ON 2016 ALREADY

Political poetic justice: Hillary, dillary dock, the pundits speed up the clock!

Contributing Columnist

Since the only suspense in Charlotte was whether the President’s acceptance speech would have to be moved indoors, the assembled punditocracy found it far more productive to speculate on the 2016 convention. In exchange for his nominating speech had Slick Willie extracted a promise from Barack Obama to support Hillary next time out (perhaps to the eventual disappointment of Joe Biden)? Was there anyone among the putative candidates, collectively known as the seven dwarfs, who could challenge Snow White? And, what of the party rank and file?

THE WEBBCAST

The flack over fracking continues — it’s time to export common sense

Contributing Columnist

It’s only been in the last year or so that controversy has erupted over the practice of “fracking,” an energy industry term that’s shorthand for “hydraulic fracturing,” a technique used to disrupt underground formations and release the oil and gas captured in the geological strata.

TEEGARDEN: TIME TO REMEMBER OUR HISTORY

Happy Labor Day, and thank you, Father Abraham!

Contributing Columnist

Because my birthday is September 1, I’ve always had a slightly skewed view of Labor Day — I thought it was in honor of my Mom. So forgive me for now suggesting that the most notable Labor Day occurrence in our history took place 150 years ago.