Guest Columns

COFFMAN: UNFUNDED FEDERAL MANDATE IS TOO COSTLY

Washington bureaucrats shouldn’t decide who uses bilingual ballots

GUEST COLUMNIST

The right to vote is sacred. When I was the Colorado Secretary of State I worked hard to make sure that every U.S. citizen who called our state home and had the legal right to cast a ballot was afforded the opportunity to do so, but I fail to see how a portion of the 1973 Voting Rights Act contributes to that by forcing an increasing number of local governments to use bilingual ballots all across the United States.

TEEGARDEN: CIVIL WAR GENERALS, PART 3

Civil War Generals Grant, Sherman and the Western Theater of War

Contributing Columnist

The Civil War battle resulting in the Union capture of Fort Donelson, in northern Tennessee, is not nearly as well known as it ought to be, given the eclectic cast of characters serving as general officers who played a role there. But most notably, it was during the preparation for and execution of this campaign that the men who would come to be celebrated as the Union’s two greatest generals began working together.

THE WEBBCAST: AMY STEPHENS DESERVES BETTER

Standing in a circle, and firing at will

Special to The Colorado Statesman

The past month’s spectacle of Congress struggling with a debt ceiling limit, and the compromises over tax increases, cuts in government spending, and the anguished rhetoric, also highlighted a unique feature of partisan politics — the ability of party members to turn upon themselves.

This phenomenon manifests itself with a peculiar exercise in which dueling party members figuratively stand in a circle and fire pistols at each other. Some fall dead, others are wounded, and no one really wins the duel.

LUNDBERG: SO MUCH FOR CUTTING RED TAPE

Colorado’s rule-making bureaucracy needs more than a timeout

GUEST COLUMNIST

When John Hickenlooper was inaugurated as Governor in of Colorado, I was encouraged by the focused attention he gave to controlling the costs and intrusiveness of regulations on the businesses and people of Colorado. Despite our political differences in other areas, I thought we had a common understanding and common interest in reducing the heavy hand of government regulation.

TEEGARDEN: CIVIL WAR GENERALS, PART 2

The Confederate Army & “defensive” strategy

Contributing Columnist

For a variety of reasons, I’ve always had more difficulty gaining insight, perspective and understanding of the main generals of the Confederacy than of their Union counterparts. One contributing factor is certainly the misleading and often false reporting of “history” through the Myth of the Lost Cause. Likewise, I suspect that it’s more difficult to focus on the positive attributes of those who both started and then lost our Civil War.

TEEGARDEN: THOSE WHO MADE THE GRADE

Civil War Generals: Part I — The Union Army

Contributing Columnist

Over the four-year duration of the Civil War, the Union Army included close to 2,500 “generals.” But that number is somewhat misleading in that it includes almost 2,000 “Brevet” Brigadier Generals. While the “Brevet” rank is somewhat complex to understand in its entirety, it is roughly analogous to a modern day combat medal or other honorary award for valor. The Brevet rank typically did not carry with it a commensurate level of authority or pay, but those who received a Brevet promotion in rank were entitled to use the associated honorific permanently.

KOPP: SOUND THE ALARM

Colorado Health Benefit Exchange may be a slow-moving train wreck

GUEST COLUMNIST

Under the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, Colorado must adapt to new federal mandates that will dramatically affect health care costs and the insurance plans available to health care consumers. How will Colorado cope with these new and costly federal mandates?

TEEGARDEN: LESSONS FROM THE CIVIL WAR

The anniversary of the Battle of Manassas

Contributing Columnist

July 21 will mark the 150th anniversary of the first “major” battle of the American Civil War, which was referred to as “Bull Run” by the Union, and as “Manassas” by the Confederates. Hopefully any serious students of this particular battle will forgive my oversimplified explanation of the battle itself, as I’ve tried to capture the highlights.

TEEGARDEN: “That this nation, under God, shall have a New Birth of Freedom”

Happy Birthday, America!

Contributing Columnist

As an undergraduate student, I once had the temerity to ask a Lincoln/Civil War scholar which of Lincoln’s numerous speeches should be considered his greatest. For a moment he looked piteously down at my lesser being, then smiled and suggested that, rather than pick one favorite, all good citizens should simply read, assimilate, and reflect upon all of them. Yikes!

TEEGARDEN: A SAD LEGACY OF AMERICAN SACRIFICE

The treatment of prisoners of war in the American Civil War was truly horrific

Contributing Columnist

During the American Civil War, prisoners of war presented major logistical, political and humanitarian challenges to both the Union and the Confederacy. And, like virtually all other aspects of that conflict, the Union, for the most part, did a better job of handling those challenges. But the horror was widespread on both sides.