Guest Columns

STYLE MATTERS: HBO’s Veep starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Women politicians and their fashions — the messages they send

Contributing Columnist

MASTERS: NO ONE IS ABOVE THE LAW

Law Day stresses courts’ role in democracy

GUEST COLUMNIST

While in a jail cell in Birmingham, Ala., Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote: “Law and order exist for the purpose of establishing justice, and when they fail in this purpose they become the dangerously structured dams that block the flow of social progress.”

HUDSON: HE WAS THE CITIZEN LEADER OUR FOUNDING FATHERS IMAGINED

Paul Sandoval earned the right to have people come to him and ‘kiss his ring’

Contributing Columnist

When I was elected to the Colorado Legislature in 1978, Paul Sandoval was elected to a Senate seat. He had already served several terms in the House, where he entered as its youngest member. Aside from Santa Claus, Paul is the only person I’ve known whose eyes genuinely twinkled. Coupled with an acerbic sense of humor, every conversation with him often became something of a laugh fest. Yet, as you chuckled at his barbs, you couldn’t help wondering what he was saying about you when the opportunity arose.

THE WEBBCAST

What should we expect from “TBD”?

Contributing Columnist

Governor Hickenlooper has shagged dozens of his “closest friends” to participate in the “TBD Colorado” process, with the lofty goal of creating “public policy recommendations for improving Colorado’s quality of life.”

We’ll miss his old-fashioned grass roots tamale parlor political style

GUEST COLUMNIST

What I will miss most about Paul Sandoval is that you could disagree with him and still be friends. That is very rare today in Denver politics. He took to heart the words of Shakespeare’s second line from Sonnet 116, “Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds.” We could disagree on candidates, issues and ideas, but after the dust of an election settled, we were still friends. After the hurly burly was done, after the battle lost or won, you picked yourself up, dusted yourself off and went on to the next battle as friends.

TEEGARDEN: RECAP OF THE CIVIL WAR

May 1862: A Civil War status report after one year of protracted fighting

Contributing Columnist

In the coming months, I look forward to writing in more detail about 1862, including tragedies (like Antietam and Fredericksburg) and triumphs (like the Emancipation Proclamation) which are part of this year’s Sesquicentennial remembrance, as well as other core antebellum and post-bellum issues.

For this week, however, since so many readers of The Colorado Statesman are about to emerge from the “fog” of the legislative session for 2012, I though it might be helpful to provide a very brief situational report on the American Civil War as it stood 150 years ago this week, in 1862.

SMITH: COMBATTING THE CARTELS REMAINS CRUCIAL

Our drug habit is killing Central America

Contributing Columnist

“He’s a born again revolutionary,” Carlos, a prominent Nicaraguan businessman says of his country’s President, Daniel Ortega.

HUDSON: WELCOME HOME!

Colorado Army National Guard Space Support Teams did their jobs well

Contributing Columnist

Last summer I wrote about the departure of Colorado Army National Guard Space Support Teams 15 & 28 for their active duty deployment to Afghanistan. Last week they returned home following nine months of barracks life in Kandahar and at Camp Leatherneck, respectively. Their welcoming ceremony was held in the Air and Space Museum at Petersen Air Force Base in Colorado Springs. The crowd was about half the size of the one that saw them off on the first of July, and was largely composed of family members.

NESBITT: PROPOSALS INCREASE THE FLEXIBILITY OF THE SYSTEM

Modernizing personnel system supports state workers and the people of Colorado

GUEST COLUMNIST

In his April 6 guest column in The Colorado Statesman, Miller Hudson asserts that Colorado voters should “think long and hard” before they approve proposed changes to a State personnel system “that has served them well for nearly a century.” While we agree with him wholeheartedly on the importance of a sound personnel system, it is a disservice to the dedicated public servants who work for the State to let sentimentality impede the progress necessary to deliver effective, efficient and elegant service to the people of Colorado.