Guest Columns

TEEGARDEN: OUR WORK REMAINS UNFINISHED…

The Civil War as America’s Iliad and Odyssey? Or maybe our Richard III

The American Civil War is often referred to as our nation's Iliad. As an enthusiastic fan of both U.S. history and Greek mythology, I’ve always enjoyed that wonderful, “Life Imitates Art” analogy. Until recently.

THE WEBBCAST: WHO WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE IN THE LEGISLATURE?

Growing the next crop of leaders in Colorado

Is it just my imagination, or do things seem less rancorous around the Statehouse as we head into the home stretch? There’s still the partisan back and forth about redistricting, but the 2012 budget got passed, and that’s a significant step.

SMITH: FORMER LEGISLATOR IMPARTED MANY LESSONS

Paul Sandoval — always true to his word

"One time Joe (Shoemaker) needed a vote on a workman’s compensation bill and asked me for it early in the session. I was a freshman and agreed. Soon, however, representatives from organized labor came down hard on me. They were lobbying very hard to kill this bill and wanted my vote. I told them that I had given my word to Joe but they still urged me to vote against the bill. So I went to Joe to explain my problem.

HUDSON: GREED TOO RESIDES IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER

Colorado Republicans misguidedly call government workers selfish, greedy culprits

The American political system appears incapable of an honest conversation about the “Great Recession” of the past few years.

PENRY: OUT OF THE CLOSET IN MY SUPPORT OF A DEMOCRAT

Not a GOP in sight? Romer’s right pick as Mayor for center and right Denverites

Republicans have a hard time figuring out exactly what do in a Denver Mayor’s race. I mean, of course we vote — dutiful and civic-minded patriots that we right-wingers are. But that’s where any semblance of certainty ends in a race like this.

TEEGARDEN: The Civil War Sesquicentennial

This time, America, insist upon meaningful answers to tough questions

Last Tuesday, April 12, was the “official” start of our four-year Sesquicentennial remembrance of the American Civil War. That’s the date in 1861 when the federal Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, was attacked.

JACKSON: JUST IN TIME FOR EARTH DAY

Cleaner cars part of solution this Earth Day

Colorado consumers face a dilemma: How can we continue to conveniently travel on a daily basis to work, school or home while limiting our impact on the environment?

HUDSON: RUINED IS GRIPPING THEATER

Mama offers oasis of sanity in insane world

Ruined by Lynn Nottage, and directed by Seret Scott. Playing at the Ricketson Theater through April 30 at the DCPA.

This 2009 Pulitzer Prize winning drama has been a much-anticipated production and it does not disappoint.

TEEGARDEN: RELIVING CIVIL WAR HISTORY

‘Civil War Days’ in April worth remembering

The twelve days from April 4 through April 15 commemorate some of the most significant events in America’s Civil War history:

MORGAN SMITH

Long ago memories of the Long Bill

Congratulations and condolences to those legislators who have volunteered to serve on the Joint Budget Committee and are now struggling to put together the Long Bill. These days, it must be an excruciating process of cutting and slashing to reach a balanced budget with declining revenues.