Guest Columns

HUDSON: THEATER SEASON IS UNDERWAY

Two fun-filled local productions worth seeing

Contributing Columnist

THE LIAR as adapted by David Ives from Pierre Corneille’s original farce. Directed by Kent Thompson at the DCPA and playing through October 16. SOME GIRL(s) by Neil LaBute, at the Edge Theater Company, 9797 W. Colfax. Directed by Rick Yaconis and playing weekends through October 23.

JONAS: OUR POLITICS CAN CHANGE

Americans Elect represents a real chance to re-boot presidential politics in 2012

GUEST COLUMNIST

Still fourteen months away, the 2012 presidential election is heating up faster and more furious than most anyone would want. Stuck with a stagnant economy and jobs market, skyrocketing debts and deficits, failing schools and crumbling infrastructure, Washington’s focus has turned to bickering about elections instead of getting anything done.

President Obama, with an eye towards November 2012, spins every speech into an “us” vs. “them” appeal in hopes of holding his base.

BROWN: COURTESY COUNTS — TOWARDS CONSTITUENTS TOO

Proposal to ban texting at public meetings a result of rude behavior by Council colleagues

GUEST COLUMNIST

It’s another Monday night meeting of the Denver City Council. Dozens of citizens have gathered in the ornate council chamber on the fourth floor of the City and County building for a controversial public hearing. It’s a time honored tradition (mandated for land use issues) that gives interested constituents three minutes at the podium to speak directly to elected officials and tell them what’s on their minds.

HUDSON: NOT CARING FOR UNINSURED MAKES ME SICK

No insurance? No health care? No way

The Colorado Statesman

As I was watching the TEA Party debate among the Republican candidates for President, it became evident why Sarah Palin and her admirers were so exorcised last year regarding the possibility of death panels. They must have known what they might expect if any of them were selected to serve on these juries. Little wonder they were alarmed. The critically ill, when uninsured, would not pass GO, nor collect $200, but would be promptly delivered directly to the closest mortician.

SMITH: LESSONS TAUGHT, LESSONS LEARNED

Jerry Kopel, the Legislator’s Legislator

GUEST COLUMNIST

Bam! The committee room slams open and a man in a black tuxedo jacket appears. He pushes a little cart slowly into the room. We go silent, we raucous and punch drunk members of the House Democratic Caucus. It is our second or third day of debating the 1976 Long Bill and exhaustion has set in. Now we see that this strange man is a waiter and he is bringing dinner to one of our members. Someone who is not satisfied with the Big Macs and French fries the rest of us are consuming voraciously.

HUDSON: I’M A JUNKIE FOR BOOKS

The well-known (and cunning) bibliophile, Mephistopheles, still murmurs in my ear

Contributing Columnist

Now that reality TV has found a profitable audience for voyeurs transfixed by the obsessive/compulsive disorders of coupon clippers, packrats and the perpetually jejune, think Jersey Shore and the Housewives of Wherever, there appears to be little shame in forthrightly acknowledging one’s pathologies. In fact, there seems to be a buck in it for nearly everyone. Consequently, I am now quietly biding my time until bibliophiles earn their turn in cable TV’s high definition spotlight.

HOLDEN: OUT OF CONTROL

Public sector attrition a “simple solution” to Colorado’s continuing budget woes

GUEST COLUMNIST

The University of Colorado increased tuition 9 percent earlier this year. University officials seem to say their numerous revenue sources — student tuition, state funding, foundations, corporate and federal grants, alumni contributions and more — are not enough. Colorado higher education is an easy target for budget cutting, but increased tuition will result in fewer students able to afford college.

It’s a small part of a larger problem.

TEEGARDEN: GRUESOME AND SOBERING STATISTICS FROM 1862

Single day of fighting in Civil War resulted in twice the deaths from terrorists of 9/11

Contributing Columnist

September 17, 1862 was the bloodiest single day in U. S. history-by a long shot.

Total deaths — the worst. Total casualties (killed, wounded and missing) — the worst. Deaths and total casualties adjusted as a percentage of total population — worse yet!

HUDSON: COLORADO’S GOVERNOR ON THE NATIONAL STAGE

The notion of Hickenlooper for President is brewing with possibilities

Contributing Columnist

If the Hancock media team really wants to raise our new Mayor’s national profile they could do worse than to take a lesson from Governor Hickenlooper. It doesn’t get any better for a Democrat than snagging a shout out from George Will. As the dean of (establishment, not Tea Party) conservative punditry, Will’s recent column helps spread the speculation that Hick just might make an appearance on the Democratic national ticket in 2016. A lot of homebrew will need to pass under the bridge before that comes to pass, but who’s to say it’s impossible?

HUDSON: A DAY OF RECOGNITION, BUT FOR WHAT?

Labor Days of the past and present

Contributing Columnist

For most Americans Labor Day is the bookend summer holiday which closes the family vacation months that begin each year with Memorial Day. Not one in a thousand could tell you it was established by a unanimous vote of Congress in 1894. Fewer still would know why such consensus prevailed. Suffice it to say that the wholesale slaughter of workers by federal troops during the Pullman strikes proved an embarrassment for both political parties. Designating a day of national recognition for the working men and women of the nation seemed expedient at the time.