Guest Columns

DAVOREN: THE PAST AND FUTURE COME TOGETHER

Goodstein’s new book evokes memories of South Denver’s colorful politicians

Phil Goodstein. The Haunts of Washington Park. Denver: New Social Publications, 2009. vi + 302 pp. ISBN 0-9743364-4-0. $19.95. maps, illustrations, index.

Reviewed By John Davoren
GUEST COLUMNIST

As a boy, I sometimes traveled across town from my home in North Denver to visit Washington Park. Particularly exciting was plunging off the high-diving tower, about 30 feet above the water, into Smith Lake. After splashing into the water, I remember sinking down, the mud encompassing my ankles. Phil Goodstein’s new book, The Haunts of Washington Park, brought this to mind and many other memories of the people and places that have made South Denver what it is.

STRAAYER: THIS IS NO TIME TO SQUANDER $1 MILLION

Memo to CSU: Wait! Don’t do it! Oops!

On May 5, in what appeared to be an attempt to outrace the Legislature’s effort to place some limits on the hiring of college and university presidents and chancellors, the Colorado State University Board of Governors rushed the selection of a chancellor and proceeded to name a single finalist: Joe Blake, the board’s own vice president.

MAROSTICA: ARVESCOUG-BIRD HANDCUFFS LEGISLATURE

Budget process is broken; SB 228 would fix it

There’s an old saying that goes, “If it jams, force it. If it breaks, it needed replacing anyways.”

That’s a pretty good summation of where we’re at with Colorado’s budget system.

LARSON: AN OPEN LETTER TO MEMBERS OF COLORADO'S LEGISLATURE

Time to let higher ed find its own funding

Having served on the Pinnacol Assurance Board of Directors (when it was still the Colorado Compensation Insurance Authority), I learned a great deal about insurance, actuaries and the difficulty of building reserves. When I was on the board, CCIA was still working hard to overcome the deep hole that was dug by the State Compensation Insurance Authority and subsequently handed to CCIA with instructions to “fix it.”

PERKINS: THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN EXPERIENCE IN THE 20TH CENTURY

Political deals threaten to destroy history of African-Americans in Radio Golf

Reviewed by Owen Perkins
GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

“Politics is about symbolism,” mayoral hopeful Harmond Wilks tells his wife in the opening moments of Radio Golf. “Black people don’t vote, but they have symbolic weight.”

TOOL: SIMPLY PUT, HERE'S WHY!

It’s time to improve Colorado’s budgeting process

As the legislative debate continues on Senate Bill 228, it has occurred to me that there are three changes that the General Assembly should consider making to our budget process. The changes would be to increase the 6 percent General Fund limit to 7.5 percent (and not eliminate it, as Senate Bill 228 would do), move the state budget to a biennial budget, and institute zero-based budgeting. Simply put, here’s why!

LINKHART: MUNICIPALITIES RESPOND TO HARD TIMES

Cities and towns throughout Colorado maintain services with shrinking revenues

The economic recession has definitely arrived on Main Street. More than half of the respondents to a recent survey of Colorado’s cities and towns said that 2008 municipal revenue collections were “worse” or “much worse” than 2007 revenue collections. Another third reported revenue collections as flat in 2008. Looking ahead, 42 percent of the cities and towns expect a further reduction in revenue in 2009.

DUBOFSKY: TABOR revenue limit would still be in place

Time to modernize Colorado’s fiscal landscape

Colorado has one of the most complex fiscal systems in the entire country. We are not, in our current form, adequately suited to deal with ever-changing economic realities. The Colorado General Assembly is currently debating a bill, Senate Bill 228, which would repeal an outdated budget formula and untie the state’s hands to get us out of the recession more quickly.

HOLDEN: LOOK AT THE NUMBERS

TABOR protects Colorado’s taxpayers

Norman Duncan’s “lobbyist and current Democrat” point of view on the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights and its attenuating effect on Colorado government and legislative process was insightful and revealing. (“Rule by TABOR flouts the founding fathers,” Colorado Statesman, Jan. 16, 2009)

MARKS: MEMORIES OF FONDER TIMES

Remembering yesterday in a new year

Memories are created, molded and made in different ways. Some are good, some are very bad, but they become a part of you. They are not meant to be forgotten, but only to be stored in the memory bank of your mind. When this new year of 2009 came into being a few weeks ago, memories of past years emerged.