Guest Columns

TORO: CHANGES ARE NEEDED TO ENSURE A BETTER SYSTEM

Gessler decision shows why Colorado needs an Independent Ethics Commission

The Colorado Statesman

The idea that an elected official cannot use state funds on partisan political events or for personal use should not be controversial. The Independent Ethics Commission’s determination that Secretary of State Scott Gessler violated state laws regarding the use of public funds was an exercise in common sense.

FULTON: ‘REGULATORY DRAG’ DRAINS CRITICAL TIME AND MONEY

To keep on trucking, we need to move toward smarter and simpler regulation

The Colorado Statesman

Recent statistics reflect that over 90 percent of the trucking companies in Colorado are made up of businesses that have 20 or less employees. Very few of these companies have a staff attorney, regulatory director, or tax specialist. Yet because of the increasing complex web of laws and regulations in our state and country, almost all of these companies at one time during the year will need to retain the services of one of these specialists.

What to wear when you want to influence people

The Colorado Statesman

Lobbying: The process of influencing public and government policy at all levels: federal, state, and local. Lobbying involves the advocacy of an interest that is affected, actually or potentially, by the decisions of government leaders. (From thefreedictionary.com)

LAMM: EULOGY OF JIM MONAGHAN, MAY 22, 2013

Jim Monaghan was my ‘mentor-in-chief’

The Colorado Statesman

All politicians stand on the shoulders of other people. Politics is a team sport — but it has the cruelest reward system, because the glory goes almost exclusively to the candidate. No day-after pictures of the smiling winning team — like sailing, soccer, football — no, no the spotlight settles on one person, almost to the exclusion of those who did the most work.

HUDSON: HOW TIME FLIES!

Denver International Airport — steeped in politics from the start… and into the future

It has been thirty years since Denver’s mayoral campaign served as the political incubator for DIA. Stapleton had been evidencing constraints for at least a decade. Park Hill neighborhoods had recently won their lawsuit against the city, which was draining substantial airport revenues to provide soundproofing against the larger, noisier passenger jets that were beginning to dominate the industry. To the east, Aurora residents were beating a path into court for similar consideration.

WILLIAMS: SENATE LOOKED BACKWARDS WITH BUSINESS AS USUAL

Minority businesses are being shut out, but we’ll never know with such outdated info

GUEST COLUMNIST

Our great state suffered a major setback last week when my colleagues on the Senate Business, Labor and Technology Committee decided to vote against 21st century Colorado in favor of 20th century business as usual.

KING: PREPARING FOR BATTLE WITH NATURE’S MOST POWERFUL FORCES

The Governor needs to fund C-FAC — or risk playing with fire in our tinder box state

GUEST COLUMNIST

One unattended campfire. One lightning strike. Or even darker and more sinister, one intentional terrorist or arsonist’s match strike. That is all it will take for a catastrophic wildfire to erupt in any part of our state’s four million acres of dead trees. A wildfire that will show no mercy and will not yield as it destroys lives, homes and our environment. The fear of fires in Colorado’s most precious water sheds alone should sound alarm bells to the highest reaches of state and federal government.

TEEGARDEN: A LOT AT STAKE IN CIVIL WAR

“Resist manfully,” Johnny Reb! All the Rebels had to do was run out the clock

Contributing Columnist

In reflecting on the greatest Civil War battles prior to Grant’s Overland Campaign of 1864/65, as well as upon public opinion in both the North and the South during that period, it’s truly bewildering that the Union didn’t “throw in the towel.” It takes nothing away from the courage and determination of the southern white people who constituted the Confederacy to say that they had the much less daunting task of the two warring sides.

ARNOLD: BRING YOUR CHECKBOOK

The new Justice Center is a monument to imperial, unaccountable Colorado

GUEST COLUMNIST

Last week’s issue of The Colorado Statesman was host to a pair of guest judiciary commentary articles extolling the virtues of the newly-opened Colorado Justice Center.

Admittedly, it is an impressive edifice — as U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor noted, with an “architectural grandeur” imposing a feeling of being “humbled before the majesty of the law.”

STYLE MATTERS

Penne Baguta and the closing of an institution

Contributing Columnist

While my love of shopping is well known, fewer people know what Mr. Style Matters likes to do. Well, its camping and mountain biking, specifically in Moab, Utah, with good friends and our two sons. The night before each trip, Mr. SM stops at Strings and buys a quadruple portion of his favorite dish — Penne Baguta. He freezes the pasta into a giant block and hides it in the back of his Toyota 4Runner. By the time the sweat-clad, cycled-out group arrives at their first campsite, the penne has melted just enough to be ready for some heating and eating.