Guest Columns

EWEGEN: A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE IN OUR CONSTITUTIONS

Nobody celebrates “The Miracle of Moscow”

The Colorado Statesman

Americans who observed Constitution Day on Sept. 17 may have stopped to contemplate “the Miracle of Philadelphia” — the convention that produced the world’s oldest continuous blueprint for ordered liberty known as the U.S. Constitution.

HUDSON: EXCUSES WON’T WIN ELECTIONS

Looking back at the recall elections, I’m still pondering what happened

The Colorado Statesman

In the entry hall at Pueblo’s Union station hang two large portraits, one of Woodrow Wilson and the other of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. During the golden age of rail, each of these Democratic Presidents made campaign stops in this hot and dusty corner of Colorado. While Roosevelt was running for re-election at the time of his visit, Wilson was attempting to sell his League of Nations, created by the Treaty of Versailles, to an isolationist and skeptical U.S. Senate. Leaving Washington Sept. 3, 1919, on a 17-state marketing tour, Wilson stumbled ascending the stage in Pueblo on Sept. 25.

TOLTZ: PUBLIC SAFETY AND LIVES ARE AT STAKE

Question: Will we let bullies with guns intimidate us into acquiescence or silence?

The Colorado Statesman

What will Coloradans do now? On this appropriately gray, rainy day political leaders and public safety citizen activists are pondering what to do in the wake of last week’s recalls of two Democratic state senators, solely due to their votes to make Colorado safer from gun violence. Will bullies with guns intimidate us into acquiescence or silence? Will Democratic state legislators back away from the gun safety bills they passed just a few months ago? These are the political questions, but public safety and lives are at stake with the answers.

TEEGARDEN: LESSONS FROM OUR FOUNDING FATHERS

Happy Birthday to the U.S. Constitution, birth defects, of course, notwithstanding

The Colorado Statesman

Happy Birthday to the U.S. Constitution. James Madison wrote it, John Marshall interpreted it, Roger Taney and Jefferson Davis tried to destroy it, and Abraham Lincoln not only saved, but also redeemed it.

Brilliant document though it was when adopted by the Constitutional Convention 226 years ago, the U. S. Constitution was originally infected with the deadly virus of slavery. By all logic, neither the document nor the democratic government it established had any chance of surviving to adulthood.

STROGOFF: THE END OF SUMMER, BUT HARDLY THE END OF POLITICS

Recall elections, mental health and Gessler’s announcement for Guv

The Colorado Statesman

When the dust finally settles after Tuesday’s recall elections in Colorado Springs and Pueblo, hopefully the results will be decisive one way or the other — not only for the sake of Democratic senators John Morse and Angie Giron whose political fate is at hand, but also for the numerous other protagonists in this high intrigue political drama that has unfolded over the past few months.

MARES: WE SHOULD NOT BE AFRAID OR ASHAMED

Dispelling myths about mental health is important — but it’s just the beginning

The Colorado Statesman

The terms mental health and mental illness are used often by the press and in other media. For most people those terms conjure a mix of different images and ideas. For some of us, the words are associated with intense feelings and personal experiences. Unfortunately, many people associate incorrect and hurtful ideas with mental health. Journalists, pundits, public officials and ordinary folks just talking about the news have perpetuated myths about what mental health means without even realizing it.

HUDSON: MARKETPLACE SOON TO OPEN

Fontneau and Colorado Health Exchange are ready to connect with Colorado

The Colorado Statesman

“…Eight,7, 6, 5, Connect4Health, 3, 2 — October 1 and the Colorado Health Exchange will open for business whether you’re ready or not!” They seem to be sales ready and politically bulletproof. Even if Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio are successful in shutting down the federal government over funding of the Affordable Care Act, Obamacare will continue to unspool in Colorado. As one of the states organizing its own health insurance marketplace, Connect4Health Colorado’s money is in the bank and there will be no strangling of this baby in the cradle.

SMITH: THE PEOPLE BEHIND THE FACES NEAR THE FENCES

What some see as border security, others see as border hysteria in Mexico

The Colorado Statesman

“Stop with the propaganda, your only making yourself look like a dumbf—k.the whole WORLD has seen multiple videos of drug gangs with machine guns and drugs crossing the border,” writes Karl Snyder on 8-28-13.

In a few days Congress will be back in session and the question of immigration reform will be front and center. The danger is that people who think like this Snyder person will dominate the debate and that the key question once again will be border security and an excessive hysteria about Mexico.

HUDSON: AN EDUCATIONAL QUAGMIRE

Higher education equates to higher tuition

The Colorado Statesman

In 1636, just 16 years after the Pilgrims disembarked at Plymouth Rock, the Great and General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony authorized the formation of Harvard College. In 1693 the Virginia House of Burgesses levied a tax on fur and tobacco exports to fund the College of William and Mary, where John Marshall, three of our presidents, and 16 signers of the Declaration of Independence were educated.

HUDSON: Who profits when the wind blows?

Transwest could really transform the West

The Colorado Statesman

Craig is one of those sun-baked Colorado towns you generally zip through on your way to some place else, only pausing long enough to gas up. It’s the kind of small town where the local paper features interviews with the new teachers arriving for the upcoming school year. Yet, last Friday the Department of Energy’s Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) and Interior’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) scheduled a public involvement meeting to explain the proposed Transwest Express Transmission Project that may soon extend 725 miles from Rawlins, Wyo.