Legislative News

Rep. Marostica's SB 228 defies GOP

By Jason Kosena
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Taking a stand is never easy.

That was the lesson learned last week by Rep. Don Marostica, a Loveland Republican and Joint Budget Committee member, when he bucked Republican leadership and continued his sponsorship of Senate Bill 228. If passed, the bill would repeal the Arveschoug-Bird spending limit, a provision passed by the Legislature in 1991 that allows Colorado’s General Fund to grow by only 6 percent per year.

FASTER bumps through House

3 votes take bill back to Senate

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

A bill to raise $265 million a year for road and bridge improvements won House approval in a close vote that split along partisan lines with the exception of four Democrats who joined the Republicans.

Sex, sin, vengeance and Senate Bills 179 and 88

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

An attorney — and a Republican for 30-something years — predicted after the November election that the GOP would become extinct if it couldn’t tame its social crusaders. He was hoping for a return to the “big tent” filled with Republicans who don’t shoot “Rhinos” or wear elephant-size righteousness like merit badges.

He probably joined the Democratic Party this week.

Bill to bring back no-fault insurance defeated

By Richard Haugh
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

A bill returning no-fault insurance to Colorado was killed Feb. 18 by a 7-3 vote in the House Business Affairs and Labor Committee.

In 2003, Colorado switched to a tort system of auto insurance, in which the at-fault driver’s insurance pays for medical bills and property damage. House Bill 1226, sponsored by Rep. Anne McGihon, D-Denver, and Sen. Morgan Carroll, D-Aurora, would have reversed that.

JBC seeks to delay budget pain

Gloom, doom under gold dome

By Jason Kosena
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Another dire forecast hit lawmakers on Monday with the unveiling of the Joint Budget Committee’s recommendation for balancing the 2008-’09 fiscal year budget during a rare joint session of the House and Senate.

The answer? Transfer cash funds and reserves into the General Fund, cut some state programs and hold
off as much pain as possible until next year.

Dems push FASTER through

SB 108 wins approval in transport committee

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Senate Bill 108, the FASTER bill, squeaked through the House Transportation and Energy Committee late Tuesday night after more than five hours of scrutiny from Republican committee members and pro-and-con testimony from 51 witnesses.

FASTER (an acronym for Funding Advancement for Surface Transportation and Economic Recovery) slipped through the committee on a 7-5 straight party line vote on Feb. 17.

Energized bipartisan Women's Legislative Caucus debuts

By Elizabeth Stortroen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

It seemed like any ordinary ladies’ night out, with drinks, laughter, food and lively conversation. But a savvy observer might have noticed that everyone at this gathering was a member of the Colorado Legislature.

Cuts stymie higher ed

By Jason Kosena
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Talk to any of leader of a public university or college in Colorado. They all say their jobs are getting harder by the week.

Tapia can’t forget what it’s like to go unpaid

By Jason Kosena
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.

That’s the lesson Sen. Abel Tapia, D-Pueblo, is taking to heart as he works to pass Senate Bill 95 through the Legislature.

Springs crowd skeptical of FASTER

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

COLORADO SPRINGS — Rep. Dennis Apuan’s townhall meeting on the economy and its impact on jobs turned from a seminar featuring House Speaker Terrance Carroll into a crisis hotline as constituents pleaded for jobs to stop the financial bleeding.