Letters to the Editor

AG Suthers: Buescher’s appointment doesn’t sit very well with me

Attorney General Suthers,

I was astounded and overwhelmingly disappointed to learn of your appointment of Bernie Buescher as deputy attorney general overseeing state services section. This is the person twice rejected by Colorado voters for re-election as state Senator and then Secretary of State. In addition to being rejected by voters, he was hand-picked by George Soros for the Democrat SOS project — i.e. if you control elections, you determine outcomes. 

Give health care reform in Colorado a chance

Dear Editor,

The National Federation of Independent Business’s opinions about health care are out of the mainstream. People do want reform and the benefits are just starting to make a difference. Given time these reform measures will not only help people by keeping them healthier, they will reduce the cost to government and businesses by having fewer sick days to pay out and reducing the cost of insurance.

Any responsible employer provides insurance for their employees and this law will only benefit them in the long run.

The pandering Sal Pace is transparent

Dear Editor,

At a recent union rally on the capitol steps in Denver, the distinguished House Minority Leader, Representative Sal Pace, D-Pueblo, came out swinging hard at the GOP. In typical fashion, Rep. Pace placed his partisan banter front and center, blaming Republicans for the misfortunes of the Colorado workforce. Unfortunately, truth be told, it has been Mr. Pace’s political party that has held Colorado’s workforce hostage for the past six years.

Webb was right about bold ideas, but diverting money from Lottery wasn’t one

Dear Editor,

I couldn’t agree more with Pete Webb’s recent column (Statesman, Jan. 7) in which he stated that tackling Colorado’s budget shortfalls requires discussing and implementing bold ideas. However, I strongly disagree with his idea to divert Lottery proceeds from Colorado’s outdoors.

I offer some novel ideas for our new Governor

Dear Editor,

It was not too many years ago that the anti-tax front (maybe the Independence Institute — I don’t recall since my short term memory is failing) proposed to solve the last budget crisis by selling off all the “excess” state supported colleges. The proposal made a logical — if not politically acceptable — argument that the sales would not only provide an infusion of needed cash to the general fund, but would also greatly improve the level of higher education in the state by making the state’s dead-wood gathering institutions subject to entrepreneurial rejuvenation.

Tuition increases are also considered taxes

Dear Editor,

Governor Hickenlooper has repeatedly stated that the public is not in the mood for any new taxes. So why does he seem to be going along with significant new increases in a regressive tax called tuition increases?

Last legislative session public education boards, and CEO (including CEO Joe Garcia) “boycotted” the Benefield, Romer, Williams concurrent resolution to help responsibly fund public education (it was an election year).

Reasons why I’m no longer a Republican are many faceted

Dear Editor,

To those of you who listened when I asked you to trust the Republican Party, I apologize.

Ritter’s legacy will be one of excess taxes and laws

Dear Editor,

You try to make Bill Ritter a great person and a leader for our youth with your story in the Dec. 24 edition of The Statesman. (“Public service, not politics, on Ritter’s agenda.”)

Despite the knocks, British cuisine is among the best!

Dear Jay (if I may),
 
Greetings from a small piece of the United Kingdom situated in downtown Denver! 

As an avid reader of your column (Jay Fox’s No More Mr. Nice Guy) I was surprised, nay shocked, at your criticism of the food from my dearly beloved homeland! But I do note that you qualify your article by saying that it was some years ago that you tasted the delights of British cooking. If you were referring to some 25 or 30 years ago, personally, I would have to agree with your summary of the British kitchen. But today is a whole new ball game (to use an Americanism!!). 

Let’s get real in our discussions about healthcare

Dear Editor,

Many folks call ObamaCare a government takeover without explaining why they use that description. Can someone please explain how a system based on private insurance companies and private healthcare providers can be a government takeover? I agree that ObamaCare changes some rules about how healthcare will be conducted, and debate about those changes is important. But the simple label of “government takeover” stifles all conversation.