Politics Uncorked

Three stores, three kinds of tastings

By Kimberly Dean
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Irecently decided to take the temperature, so to speak, of the wine biz around town. By calling a few stores to get a feel for the wine tastings in and around Denver, I uncovered some different views on how the tastings affect the business of selling wine.

Voting on the fall menu at Randolph’s

By Kimberly Dean
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Every autumn season in September, Randoph’s Restaurant at the Warwick Hotel in Denver hosts a Fall Menu Tasting along with a wine pairing. This was by far the most decadent event I’d attended so far for Politics Uncorked. I invited a new friend to come along, writer Laurie Budgar, whom I met at the wine tasting at the Governor’s Mansion the previous month.

Green wine: Environmentally savvy Jack Rabbit Hill spearheads shift to steel kegs

By Kimberly Dean
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Jack Rabbit Hill prides itself on being environmentally conscientious with their out-of-the-box thinking. This unique-to-Colorado farm property also includes some production of organic vodka and gin, not to mention their newest addition: hops. The organic spirits are sold through their other venture, Peak Spirits, and they were recently given a $10,000 grant for re-creating their labels for marketing.

Sharing space: Two Rivers hosts Kahil Winery

By Kimberly Dean
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

In mid-September, as we drove from the Colorado Mountain Winefest at Riverbend Park in Palisade to Grand Junction, we crossed a bridge where we saw two rivers on the left side of us converge. They are the Gunnison and Colorado Rivers that inspired the name of the winery we were about to visit. The Two Rivers Winery and Chateau has several matching buildings on a large property that also contains some grapevines. The setting was something out of a picture book and was very inviting.

Green wine: Paving the way for the organic wine movement in Colorado

By Kimberly Dean
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

There are actually five regions in Colorado where grapes are grown, so we thought it might be interesting to taste wine made from the different areas and give our take on them. Each region has its own climate and landscape and therefore, different grapes that grow well in each area. I have tasted wines from Palisade in the Grand Valley, which were gorgeous, but I had yet to try anything from the West Elks region, which is located along the North Fork of the Gunnison River between Paonia and Hotchkiss.

Riesling rhapsody

By Kimberly Dean
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

“Whitewater Hill Riesling, Grand Valley 2008, produced and bottled by Whitewater Hill Vineyards, Grand Junction, Colorado.” The label says it is handgrown, handpicked, and handcrafted 100 percent Colorado grown. The tasting notes say it has a “delicate aroma of apricots and jasmine. Fruits of citrus, peach, and nectarine with a hint of lime that lingers on your tongue.”

Wine at the Warwick: Proximity to Capitol makes Randolph’s a hit with pols

By Kimberly Dean
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

One doesn’t need to go far to have a good time, so why not walk to a wine tasting near the Capitol? And if you over-indulge in a wine you really like you can always get a room upstairs to avoid driving…

Drinking for a cause: Argonaut, Park Hill Golf Club team up for Easter Seals

By Kimberly Dean
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

On the fourth Tuesday of every month, Argonaut Wine & Liquors hosts a wine tasting at the Park Hill Golf Club in Denver from 5:30-7:30 p.m. I was invited to attend the monthly wine tasting and benefit by Sheila Carey of Argonaut, so I gratefully accepted.

Through the Grapevine

By Kimberly Dean
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

The wine and liquor shop Grape Expectations on Kearney Street in Denver is a family owned and operated business. Owner John King employs his daughter Katie, and son Matt. Chas Patterson, an honorary part of the family, was also there the day I stopped in for a chat.

Wine across the board

Despite challenges, industry grows in Colo.

By Kimberly Dean
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Some of you might agree that nothing goes better with politics than wine. In fact, wine can sometimes be the main event, or at least the main topic of conversation. Perhaps we should start at the beginning…